Back to Top Skip to main content

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

Health Surveillance, Analysis and Insight for Action

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch is the central epidemiology health resource for the US Military and Public Health

The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) is the central epidemiologic resource for the U.S. Armed Forces, conducting medical surveillance to protect those who serve our nation in uniform and allies who are critical to our national security interests. Explore our website to learn about the critical role AFHSB plays in force health protection.

AFHSB provides timely, relevant, actionable and comprehensive health surveillance information to promote, maintain, and enhance the health of military and military-associated populations.

AFHSB critical functions are:

  • Acquire, analyze, interpret, disseminate information, and recommend evidence-based policy
  • Develop, refine, and improve standardized health surveillance methods
  • Serve as the focal point for sharing health surveillance products expertise and information
  • Coordinate a global program of military-relevant infectious disease surveillance

Explore our health surveillance resources to learn how to utilize our data applications, systems and the ways our health information analysis supports worldwide disease surveillance and public health activities to improve the U.S. military's Force Health Protection (FHP) program.

More About Us

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report MSMR Online SubscriptionThe Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) is AFHSB's flagship publication. The monthly peer-reviewed journal provides evidence-based estimates of the incidence, distribution, impact, and trends of health-related conditions among service members. Additionally, the MSMR focuses one issue per year on the absolute and relative morbidity burden attributable to various illnesses and injuries among service members and beneficiaries.

View Current Report  View Archived Reports

Health Surveillance Explorer

The Health Surveillance Explorer (HSE) is a dynamic CAC-enabled mapping application that allows the Geo­graphic Combatant Commands (GCCs) to identify global health threats and disease outbreaks in near-real time. It provides timely, relevant and actionable health surveillance information to military leaders around the globe. The HSE makes it more efficient and effective to assemble surveillance data.

Launch HSE

Proposal Management Information System

Launch Proposal Management Information SystemThe Proposal Management Information System (ProMIS) program is a web-based application used to facilitate program management at the AFHSB's Global Emerging Infections Surveillance (GEIS) section. Investigators in the GEIS partner network submit proposals for funding consideration and GEIS operations staff monitors the progress of those projects.

Go to ProMIS

Defense Medical Epidemiology Database

DMED ButtonThe Defense Medical Epidemiology Database (DMED) provides worldwide access to de-identified data contained in the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS). Through this user-friendly interface, authorized users can create customized queries of disease and injury rates in active duty populations.

Go to DMED

You also may be interested in...

The Defense Medical Epidemiology Database System Overview Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet
5/12/2017

This fact sheet provides a system overview of the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database (DMED). DMED is a web-based tool to remotely query de-identified active component personnel and medical event data contained within the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS). Learn about the newly released version of DMED and its key features in this document.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Defense Medical Epidemiology Database

Global Influenza Summary: May 7, 2017

Report
5/7/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | AFHSB Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Global Influenza Summary: April 30, 2017

Report
4/30/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | AFHSB Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

DoD Global, Laboratory-Based Influenza Surveillance Program, 2014- 2015 Season

Infographic
4/17/2017
The DoD Global, Laboratory-Based, Influenza Surveillance Program is a DoD-wide, year-round program that tests respiratory specimens from DoD beneficiaries presenting to military treatment facilities with influenza-like illness (ILI). ILI is defined as an illness characterized by a fever 100.5 degrees F or greater and cough or sore throat within 72 hours of seeking treatment. Sentinel sites submit 6-10 specimens per week from beneficiaries presenting with ILI. Each specimen is tested via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and viral culture. The 2014-2015 influenza season was dominated by influenza A (H3N2) at the beginning; however by Week 10, identifications of influenza B viruses were more numerous than for influenza A. Out of a total of 6,432 specimens, 32.7% were positive for influenza. Additionally 19.6% of specimens were positive for other respiratory pathogens while 47.7% specimens were negative. The molecular characterization of specimens showed that the majority of influenza A (H3N2) viruses circulating had drifted from the vaccine strain by December 2014. This finding was in agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization observations during the 2014-2015 influenza season. For more information visit Health.mil/AFHSB

The DoD Global, Laboratory-Based, Influenza Surveillance Program is a DoD-wide, year-round program that tests respiratory specimens from DoD beneficiaries presenting to military treatment facilities with influenza-like illness (ILI).

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

Zika Virus Infections in Military Health System Beneficiaries

Infographic
4/17/2017
The introduction and rapid spread of the Zika virus (ZIKV), a Flavivrus of the Flaviviridae family, across the Western Hemisphere have posed a risk of infection to Military Health System (MHS) beneficiaries. This report documents: •	The impact of ZIKV transmission on MHS beneficiaries. •	ZIKV spread to nearly 50 countries and territories within a 17-month period. •	Among affected service members, the Army reported the most Zika cases. •	There have been 156 confirmed cases of Zika in MHS beneficiaries. •	A majority of cases reported exposure in Puerto Rico (n=91, 58.3%). Geographic regions of potential exposure to Zika cases in MHS beneficiaries between 01 Jan – 30 Nov 2016 included: •	Puerto Rico ( 91 cases) •	Caribbean ( 41 cases) •	Central America & Mexico (15 cases) •	South America (6 cases) •	Asia ( 3 cases) •	Unknown (3) •	U.S. Florida (1 case) Cases in Service Members Between 01 Jan – 30 Nov 2016 were: •	Army (48 cases) •	Coast Guard (29 cases) •	Air Force (16 cases) •	Navy (10 cases) •	Marine Corps (7 cases) Although most ZIKV infections are asymptomatic or have a relatively mild illness, the gravity of pregnancy and neurologic issues linked to infection remains a significant impetus for the continued surveillance of ZIKV in the MHS population. For more Zika surveillance and information on signs and symptoms, visit Health.mil/AFHSB

The introduction and rapid spread of the Zika virus (ZIKV), a Flavivrus of the Flaviviridae family, across the Western Hemisphere have posed a risk of infection to Military Health System (MHS) beneficiaries.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Zika Virus | In the Spotlight

Findings from The Department of Defense Global, Laboratory-Based Influenza Surveillance Program, 2015-2016 Influenza Season

Infographic
4/17/2017
The Department of Defense (DoD) Global, Laboratory-Based, Influenza Surveillance Program monitors the circulation of influenza viruses throughout each influenza season. Each season runs from the beginning of October through end of the next September. During the 2015 – 2016 influenza season, a total of 4,591 specimens were tested from 80 locations. The predominant influenza strain was A (H1N1) pdm09. Additionally peak influenza activity occurred during weeks 7 – 13 (14 February – 2 April 2016). Of those submitted for routine surveillance, 1,182 (25.7%) tested positive for other respiratory pathogens, 377 (8.2%) tested positive for influenza B, 755 (16.5%) tested positive for influenza A, and 2,277 (49.6%) tested negative. For more information on the 2015-2016 influenza season and how to identify influenza-like illness (ILI), read the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) at Health.mil/AFHSB.

The Department of Defense (DoD) Global, Laboratory-Based, Influenza Surveillance Program monitors the circulation of influenza viruses throughout each influenza season. Each season runs from the beginning of October through end of the next September.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

Global Influenza Summary: April 16, 2017

Report
4/16/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | AFHSB Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

New and Improved Defense Medical Epidemiology Database

Infographic
4/4/2017
The new and improved Defense Medical Epidemiology Database (DMED), known as DMED 5.0, is now only available online.  DMED provides timely and efficient access to data of active component personnel and medical event data.  It contains a subset of data from the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS), offering remote access to tri-service epidemiologic data. Moreover, it protects privacy using only de-identified data and updates monthly.  The new DMED features an enhanced user interface, query data using ICD-9 and ICD-10 diagnostic codes granting authorized users to search multiple databases simultaneously. These users are U.S. military personnel (DoD-CaC users) or Federal partners and civilian collaborators in military medical research and operations. Authorized U.S. military personnel with access to DMED include medical providers, epidemiologists, medical researchers, safety officers, and medical operations and clinical support staff. Sign up for a new account at www.health.mil/dmed

The new and improved Defense Medical Epidemiology Database (DMED), known as DMED 5.0, is now only available online. DMED provides timely and efficient access to data of active component personnel and medical event data.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Defense Medical Epidemiology Database

Update: Exertional Hyponatremia U.S. Armed Forces, 2001-2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Exertional Hyponatremia occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is defined by a serum, plasma or blood sodium concentration below 135 millequivalents per liter. This infographic provides an update on Exertional Hyponatremia among U.S. Armed Forces, information on service members at high risk. Exertional hyponatremia can result from loss of sodium and/or potassium as well as relative excess of body water. There were 1,519 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component service members from 2001 through 2016. 86.8 percent were diagnosed and treated without having to be hospitalized. 2016 represented a decrease of 23.3 percent from 2015. In 2016, there were 85 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component service members and 77.6 percent of exertional hyponatremia cases affected males.  The annual rate was higher among females. Service members age 40 and over were most affected by exertional hyponatremia. High risk service members of exertional hyponatremia were: •	Females •	Service members aged 19 years or younger •	White, non-Hispanic and Asian/ Pacific Islander service members •	Recruit Trainees •	Marine Corps members Learn more at www.Health.mil/MSMR

Exertional Hyponatremia occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is defined by a serum, plasma or blood sodium concentration below 135 millequivalents per liter. This infographic provides an update on Exertional Hyponatremia among U.S. Armed Forces, information on service members at high risk. Exertional hyponatremia can result from loss of sodium and/or potassium as well as relative excess of body water.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Physical Activity

Minority Health Heat Illness Active Component U.S. Armed Forces, 2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Heat illness refers to a spectrum of disorders that occur when the body is unable to dissipate heat absorbed from the external environment and the heat generated by internal metabolic processes. As heat illness progresses, failure of one or more body systems can occur. This report summarizes reportable medical events of heat illnesses, heat-related hospitalizations and ambulatory visits among minority active component members (Black, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islanders) during 2016. In 2016, incidence rates of heat stroke were highest among Asian/ Pacific Islanders than any other ethnicity. Crude incidence rate of “other heat illnesses” was higher among females than males.  Heat Incidence cases: •	Black, non-Hispanic heat illness incidence cases – 64 for heatstroke and 389 for other heat illnesses •	Hispanic heat illness incidence cases—  63 for heatstroke and 320 for other heat illnesses •	Asian/ Pacific Islander heat illness incidence cases – 32 for heatstroke and for  117 other heat illnesses Incidence rates: •	Black, non-Hispanic incidence rates – 0.30 for heatstroke and 1.84 for other heat illnesses •	Hispanic incidence rates – 0.33 for heatstroke and 1.67 for other heat illnesses •	Asian/Pacific Islander – 0.62 for heatstroke and 2.26 for other heat illnesses Of all military members, the youngest and most inexperienced marines and soldiers – particularly those training at installations in the south eastern U.S. – are at highest risk of heat illnesses including heat stroke, exertional hyponatremia, and exertional rhabdomyolysis. Learn more at www.Health.mil/MSMR

Heat illness refers to a spectrum of disorders that occur when the body is unable to dissipate heat absorbed from the external environment and the heat generated by internal metabolic processes. As heat illness progresses, failure of one or more body systems can occur. This report summarizes reportable medical events of heat illnesses, heat-related hospitalizations and ambulatory visits among minority active component members (Black, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islanders) during 2016.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Summer Safety

Global Influenza Summary: April 2, 2017

Report
4/2/2017

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | AFHSB Reports and Publications | Influenza Summary and Reports

Rhabdomyolysis by Location, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012-2016 Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet
3/30/2017

This fact sheet provides details on Rhabdomyolysis by location for active component, U.S. Armed Forces during a five-year surveillance period from 2012 through 2016. The medical treatment facilities at nine installations diagnosed at least 50 cases each and, together approximately half (49.9%) of all diagnosed cases.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Demographic and Military Traits of Service Members Diagnosed as Traumatic Brain Injury Cases

Fact Sheet
3/30/2017

This fact sheet provides details on the demographic and military traits of service members diagnosed as traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases during a 16-year surveillance period from 2001 through 2016, a total of 276,858 active component service members received first-time diagnoses of TBI - a structural alteration of the brain or physiological disruption of brain function caused by an external force.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Heat Illnesses by Location, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012-2016 Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet
3/30/2017

This fact sheet provides details on heat illnesses by location during a five-year surveillance period from 2012 through 2016. 11,967 heat-related illnesses were diagnosed at more than 250 military installations and geographic locations worldwide. Three Army Installations accounted for close to one-third of all heat illnesses during the period.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Routine Screening for Antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Infographic
3/17/2017
The Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the cause of Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. This infographic provides an update on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among civilian applicants for the U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces during a January 2011 - June 2016 surveillance period.  Since October 1985, the U.S. military has conducted routine screening for antibodies to HIV-1 to enable adequate and timely medical evaluations, treatment and counseling; to prevent unwitting transmission; and protect the battlefield blood supply. From January 2015 through June 2016, 463,132 civilian applicants for U.S. military service were tested. 124 were identified as HIV antibody positive. During 2015, one was detected with antibodies to HIV per 3,267 screening tests. Annual seroprevalences peaked in 2015, up 29% from 2014. The seroprevalences were much higher among males than females and among black, non-Hispanics than other race/ethnicity groups. Seroprevalences decreased by approximately 26% among male applicants, dropped to zero among female applicants, and decreased by 43% among black, non-Hispanic applicants.  As for the active component of the U.S. Army, 548,974 soldiers were tested from January 2015 through June 2016. 120 were identified as HIV antibody positive. During 2015, one was detected with antibodies to HIV per 5,265 screening tests. Of the 515 active component soldiers diagnosed with HIV infections since 2011, a total of 291 (57%) were still in military service in 2016. Annual seroprevalences for male active component Army members greatly exceed those of females.  Among active and reserve component service members, seroprevalences continue to be higher among Army and Navy members and males than their respective counterparts. Service members who are infected with HIV receive clinical assessments, treatments, and counseling; they may remain in service as long as they are capable of performing their military duties. Learn more at Health.mil/AFHSB

The Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the cause of Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. This infographic provides an update on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among civilian applicants for the U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces during a January 2011 - June 2016 surveillance period.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment
<< < ... 6 7 8 9 > >> 
Showing results 91 - 105 Page 7 of 9

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.