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All in with medical support during Warrior Games

Article
6/5/2018
About 60 medical professionals in the Military Health System have volunteered to work at the DoD Warrior Games to support competitors including Army 1st Sgt. Jay Collins (above), who's scheduled to run, cycle, and row - among other events - as a member of the U.S. Special Operations Command team. (Photo courtesy USSOCOM Office of Communication)

Altitude will be latest challenge for athletes

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Best job in military health? For these men, it’s nursing

Article
5/8/2018
Nurse Manny Santiago (right) with retired Marine Corps Sgt. Carlos Evans in October at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Santiago said he “had the privilege of taking care of this young man” after Evans stepped on an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan in May 2010 during his fourth combat deployment. The two men discovered they’re both from the same hometown in Puerto Rico. (Courtesy photo)

Males outnumbered, but odds are better in MHS

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Second lady Karen Pence advocates art therapy for wounded warriors

Article
2/8/2018
Second Lady Karen Pence (right), speaks with Army Col. David Gibson, commander of the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, during a roundtable discussion about the National Intrepid Center of Excellence Satellite Center's art therapy program at Fort Hood, Texas. Pence has been touring Creative Forces Military Healing Arts networks at military facilities as part of her advocacy for the use of art therapy to help heal service members suffering from traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress. (U.S. Army photo by Patricia Deal)

Pence's passion is driven by the human and scientific evidence of art therapy's healing properties

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Year in Review: Innovations aid warfighters, families

Article
12/26/2017
Blue light produced by smartphones and computer monitors interferes with the brain’s production of melatonin, the hormone that makes people sleepy. The Navy’s Bureau of Medicine is working on lens tinting to block blue light and enhance the sleep of service members. MHS announced this innovation among many others in 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo by Greg L. Davis)

MHS explores world-class solutions for beneficiaries

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Military Health System Electronic Health Record | MHS GENESIS | Warrior Care | Medical Research and Development

2017 Year in Review: Places where Military Health System leaders, experts gathered

Article
12/21/2017
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director, Defense Health Agency, speaks at the Defense Health Information Technology Symposium, July 25, in Orlando, Florida. Conferences like this one help MHS and other health care personnel to exchange ideas and information to help improve care to beneficiaries. (Courtesy photo)

Conferences offer opportunities to focus on the best health care for beneficiaries

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Innovation | Military Health System Electronic Health Record | MHS GENESIS | Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence | Warrior Care

Invisible wound, visible effects: TBIs need medical help – and the sooner, the better

Article
12/13/2017
Traumatic brain injuries can happen anywhere. Regardless of how or when, all TBIs need medical attention, experts warn. (Photo courtesy of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center)

The road to recovery for a traumatic brain injury starts with an evaluation. Regardless of severity or cause, all TBIs require medical attention, experts warn.

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Traumatic Brain Injury | Warrior Care
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