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Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

Mosquito-borne illness is a significant public health concern, both to the Department of Defense (DoD) and to the broader national and international public health community. Here, we provide a collection of resources to assist in education and risk communication for partners and stakeholders on issues relating to mosquito control and prevention, as well as the prevention of mosquito-borne infectious disease.

Did you know?

Adult mosquitoes don't usually survive the high winds of a hurricane, but flood waters after the storm will result in large populations of floodwater mosquitoes. These "nuisance" mosquitoes don't typically spread viruses that can make you sick. However, the types of mosquitoes that can spread viruses may increase anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 months after a hurricane, especially in areas that didn't flood but received more rainfall than usual. >>Learn More about Mosquitoes & Hurricanes

Learn about Prevention of Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

We are focusing on the specific illnesses below, but this list could be expanded in the future:

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Prevent mosquito-borne illness in the U.S. and overseas

Article
7/31/2019
Most mosquitoes are relatively harmless. But some can cause serious diseases

Mosquitoes can spread dangerous diseases no matter where you are

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Avoid bug bites on vacation with these TRICARE tips

Article
7/30/2019
According to the EPA, using the right insect repellent can discourage mosquitoes, ticks, and other insects from landing on you and biting you

If you’re traveling to areas where they may be a higher chance of getting malaria from mosquitoes or tick-borne diseases like Lyme disease, take steps to avoid these bugs and others.

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Zapping mosquitoes from the inside out

Article
7/29/2019
While chemical mosquito population control measures have been used with some degree of success, they are toxic to other insect populations and to the health of humans. A different angle of defense has emerged, which is genetic modification of the mosquito itself, making it transgenic. Transgenic mosquitoes are unable to transmit a pathogen, such as malaria, due to their altered genetic makeup. (DoD photo)

Mosquitoes aren’t just annoying at summer barbecues. In many parts of the world, they carry pathogens for Zika, dengue, yellow fever and malaria, the most devastating of mosquito-borne diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 440,000 people died in sub-Saharan Africa in 2016 from malaria, contracted from the bite of an infected female Anopheles mosquito. Protecting U.S. military personnel who continue to serve in this part of world is critical.

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Bug Week: July 27 - August 2 | Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Zika Virus | Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Preventive Health | Innovation | Medical Research and Development | Deployment Health

Summer may be gone, but West Nile Virus remains a threat

Article
10/24/2018
Mosquito activity is still at its peak during early fall but taking steps to prevent mosquito bites can reduce risk of West Nile Virus. (U.S. Army photo)

Taking steps to prevent mosquito bites can be the best way to reduce risk of West Nile Virus infection and other mosquito-borne illnesses

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Public Health | Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

Army invention traps things that go buzz in the day

Article
7/30/2018
Aedes albopictus, is one type of mosquito responsible for spreading dengue and yellow fevers as well as the Zika and chikungunya viruses, are common throughout eastern and southern portions of the United States, South America, and other parts of the world. (Courtesy photo)

Device targets mosquitoes that transmit diseases

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Joint efforts in search of a cure for tropical diseases

Article
1/11/2018
Dr. Gissella Vasquez, deputy director of the Entomology Department at the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 6, inspects a vector trap at Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras. The Joint Task Force-Bravo Medical Element, NAMRU- 6 and the Uniformed Service University of the Health Sciences partnered for an ongoing tropical disease study, testing live samples and collecting vectors that could be potential carriers for diseases. (U.S. Army photo by Maria Pinel)

Malaria. Dengue. Zika.

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Global Health Engagement | Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Health Readiness
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