Back to Top Skip to main content

Hospital ship USNS Comfort returns home after completing mission

Family and friends of crew members aboard Military Sealift Command’s hospital ship USNS Comfort wait as the ship pulls into Naval Station Norfolk, Dec. 18. Comfort returned to Virginia after completing its 11-week medical support mission to South and Central America, part of U.S. Southern Command’s Operation Enduring Promise initiative. (U.S. Navy photograph by Brian Suriani) Family and friends of crew members aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort wait as the ship pulls into Naval Station Norfolk, Dec. 18. Comfort returned to Virginia after completing its 11-week medical support mission to South and Central America, part of U.S. Southern Command’s Operation Enduring Promise initiative. (U.S. Navy photograph by Brian Suriani)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Global Health Engagement | Global Health Security Agenda

NORFOLK, Virginia – The U.S. Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort pulled into Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, Dec. 18, after completing its deployment to South and Central America.

Comfort’s return to Norfolk signifies the conclusion of an 11-week medical support mission to the region as part of U.S. Southern Command’s Operation Enduring Promise initiative.

“The men and women on USNS Comfort, representing the best of the United States Navy and our nation, treated over 26,000 patients and conducted approximately 600 surgeries aboard the ship and at land-based sites,” said Navy Rear Adm. Sean Buck, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command. “Their work made a big difference in Central and South America in ways both concrete and intangible for years to come.”

Comfort’s embarked medical team worked with health and government partners in Ecuador, Peru, Colombia and Honduras, providing care both aboard the ship and at land-based medical sites, helping to relieve pressure on national medical systems caused partially by an increase in cross-border migrants. The deployment reflected the United States’ enduring promise of friendship, partnership and solidarity with the Americas.

“This deployment reflects the United States enduring promise of friendship, partnership and solidarity with our partners in the Americas,” added Buck.

The ship’s crew included more than 465 U.S. and partner nation military doctors, nurses and corpsmen. In addition, about 90 medical and dental professional volunteers from non-governmental organizations were aboard to support the medical assistance mission. The mission was supported by a team of approximately 70 of Military Sealift Command’s civil service mariners who oversaw the ship’s operation and navigation. During the mission, USNS Comfort visited Esmeraldas, Ecuador; Paita, Peru; Turbo, Colombia; Riohacha, Colombia; and Trujillo, Honduras.

“We had an opportunity to work with all of our friends and partners in the region and provide amazing care for a lot of folks who really needed it,” said Navy Capt. William Shafley, USNS Comfort’s mission commander, “The mission could not have been successful if we had not worked as a team. We feel the mission was a tremendous success and we are all very proud of the work we have done.”

Health services provided during USNS Comfort’s deployment included general surgery, ophthalmologic surgery, dermatology, medical evaluation and treatment, preventive medicine, dental screenings and treatment, optometry screenings, eyewear distribution, and general public health. Medical capabilities aboard the hospital ship include surgical and post-surgical rooms, a CAT-scan unit, four X-ray machines, a dental suite, an optometry lab, a physical therapy area, two oxygen-producing plants and a 5,000-unit blood bank.

“Our team did a great job working with partners from 11 different countries and non-governmental organizations,” said Navy Capt. Kevin Buckley, commanding officer, USNS Comfort Medical Treatment Facility. “The team really came together during this deployment and used all of our skills while working with our partners to the south. As a professional, working with everyone on this deployment was truly an awesome experience.”

During the port visits, Comfort’s medical team conducted a variety of surgeries including cataracts, hernias, cleft palates and more. Additionally, Comfort hosted approximately 1,000 distinguished visitors and guests during 53 distinguished visitor and media days to include the President of Honduras and Prime Minister of Peru.

“To the Enduring Promise Team and the USNS Comfort, congratulations and thank you for demonstrating America’s enduring concern for our neighbors to the south,” said U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis in a message to USNS Comfort’s crew. “As you return home, you carry the thanks and respect of those you treated in Ecuador, Peru, Columbia and Honduras. In a world awash in change with displaced populations, fragmented relationships and great power competition, your deployment delivered a sense of concern and humanity amidst chaos.”

The USNS Comfort’s Enduring Promise mission demonstrated U.S commitment to the Americas and is part of a continuum of support provided by U.S. Southern Command. SOUTHCOM sponsored civic assistance and humanitarian missions were conducted in close cooperation with partner nations in the region as well as with U.S. interagency partners at the U.S. Department of State and USAID. Similar missions include Continuing Promise, New Horizons, Beyond the Horizon, medical readiness training exercises and the Medical Civil Action Program.

This mission marked the sixth time the hospital ship has provided medical assistance in the region. Since first deploying to the region on a similar mission more than a decade ago, the hospital ship has visited 18 nations in the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. During those missions, military medical professionals worked with host nation and civilian partners to provide medical treatment to nearly 390,000 people, including more than 6,000 surgeries.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Preventive Medicine techs foil the foe

Article
5/6/2019
The Food Safety Managers Course can positively impact mission readiness. By inspecting food and food service facilities, and if needed, conducting bacteriological analysis of food, water, and ice samples keeps those food and water borne contaminants away. (U.S. Army photo)

The adversary can impact Sailors and Marines everywhere

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

New training prepares Airmen to save lives

Article
5/2/2019
Tactical Combat Casualty Care is a two-day course created by the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care, and adopted by National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. It teaches life-saving skills and methods proven effective in a combat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

TCCC teaches Airmen to treat injuries until medical care arrives

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

William Beaumont Army Medical Center rivals prestigious cancer centers

Article
5/1/2019
Army Maj. Daniel Nelson, surgical oncologist and director of the Commission on Cancer at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, instructs medical residents during a bilateral mastectomy at WBAMC. Nelson, the only board-certified surgical oncologist in El Paso, is one of many physicians with advanced medical training, along with WBAMC’s Commission on Cancer, preparing medical residents for unconventional cases they may experience throughout their careers. (U.S. Army photo By Marcy Sanchez)

William Beaumont Army Medical Center has more than a half century of experience in providing cancer care

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Hospitalizations, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018

Infographic
5/1/2019
Hospitalizations

Hospitalizations, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018 This report documents the frequencies, rates, trends, and distributions of hospitalizations of active component members of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps during calendar year 2018.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens

Infographic
5/1/2019
Absolute and relative morbidity burdens

Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable To Various Illnesses and Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018 This annual summary uses a standard disease classification system (modified for use among U.S. military members) and several healthcare burden measures to quantify the impacts of various illnesses and injuries among members of the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces in 2018.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, Non-Service Member Beneficiaries of the Military Health System, 2018

Infographic
5/1/2019
Morbidity Burdens

The current report represents an update and provides a summary of care provided to non-service members in the MHS during calendar year 2018. Healthcare burden estimates are stratified by direct versus outsourced care and across 4 age groups of healthcare recipients.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Ambulatory Visits, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018

Infographic
5/1/2019
Ambulatory Visits

Ambulatory Visits, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018 This report documents the frequencies, rates, trends, and characteristics of ambulatory healthcare visits of active component members of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps during 2018.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

MSMR Vol. 26 No. 5 - May 2019

Report
5/1/2019

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Modeling Lyme disease host animal habitat suitability, West Point, New York; Incidence, timing, and seasonal patterns of heat illnesses during U.S. Army basic combat training, 2014–2018; Update: Heat illness, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018; Update: Exertional rhabdomyolysis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2014–2018; Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2003–2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

Navy surgeon general addresses transition during visit to pacific northwest

Article
4/30/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Forrest Faison, Navy surgeon general and chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery takes time to share a few words with staff at Naval Hospital Bremerton's Urgent Care Clinic during his official visit at the command that included additional stops in the Pacific Northwest at Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor and Madigan Army Medical Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Douglas Stutz)

Navy Medicine and military medicine is in the midst of immense change and transition

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Medical Airmen train in Puerto Rico during Vigilant Guard

Article
4/26/2019
Airmen and Soldiers from the 3rd Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Task Force, Pennsylvania National Guard, evacuate a casualty actor during the exercise Vigilant Guard, at Camp Santiago in Salinas, Puerto Rico. Members of the Pennsylvania and Puerto Rico National Guard worked together to provide joint disaster relief training. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Tony Harp)

Vigilant Guard is a U.S. Northern Command and National Guard Bureau sponsored event

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Field emergency room drills strengthen bonds of U.S. Navy, Swedish medics

Article
4/24/2019
Navy Cmdr. Mark Lambert (center) and Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Amos Bogs (right), work with Capt. Peter Landell (left), Swedish Armed Forces, during a multinational medical drill, Cincu Military Base, Romania, during exercise Vigorous Warrior 19. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt. Andrew Layton)

Vigorous Warrior is a biannual readiness event organized by the NATO Military Medicine Centre of Excellence

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Pediatric medical services providers increase access to care for beneficiaries

Article
4/23/2019
Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Jason Caboot, pediatric pulmonologist, Madigan Army Medical Center, examines Jacob Schaff, an established pediatric specialty care patient at Naval Hospital Bremerton, Washington. The Schaff’s often find themselves traveling throughout the Puget Sound area to seek the specialty care Jacob requires. (U.S. Navy photo by Emily Yeh)

Pediatric medical services providers established a program that increases access to care for beneficiaries

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Children's Health

Changes coming to military medical treatment facilities

Article
4/22/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, Defense Health Agency director, speaks with members of the 42nd Medical Group about upcoming changes to military treatment facilities, at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. The DHA will be responsible for all facilities with respect to budgetary matters, information technology, health care administration and management, administrative policy and procedure and military medical construction. (U.S. Air Force photo by William Birchfield)

The DHA is as committed to the Air Force as the Air Force is to the DHA

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

New electronic health record integrates all aspects of care

Article
4/19/2019
Maj. Gen. Lee Payne (right) is escorted into Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms by hospital Commanding Officer, Capt. Nadji Hariri, for a site visit on the launch of MHS GENESIS, the military's new electronic record-keeping system, April 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Dave Marks)

Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee Payne and his team of military healthcare professionals visited Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms

Recommended Content:

MHS GENESIS | Military Health System Electronic Health Record | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Medical logistics Airmen enable lifesaving skills at NATO exercise

Article
4/18/2019
Civilian first responders from Romania participate along with Airmen from the 86th Medical Group, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, in a multinational medical exercise drill during Vigorous Warrior 19, Cincu Military Base, Romania. Vigorous Warrior 19 is NATO’s largest military medical exercise, uniting more than 2,500 participants from 39 countries to exercise experimental doctrinal concepts and test their medical assets together in a dynamic, multinational environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt. Andrew Layton)

Uniting upwards of 2,500 providers from 39 countries, the exercise is the largest medical readiness event in NATO

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Medical Logistics | Global Health Engagement
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 61 - 75 Page 5 of 49

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.