Back to Top Skip to main content

Field emergency room drills strengthen bonds of U.S. Navy, Swedish medics

Navy Cmdr. Mark Lambert (center) and Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Amos Bogs (right), work with Capt. Peter Landell (left), Swedish Armed Forces, during a multinational medical drill, Cincu Military Base, Romania, during exercise Vigorous Warrior 19. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt. Andrew Layton) Navy Cmdr. Mark Lambert (center) and Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Amos Bogs (right), work with Capt. Peter Landell (left), Swedish Armed Forces, during a multinational medical drill, Cincu Military Base, Romania, during exercise Vigorous Warrior 19. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt. Andrew Layton)

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

CINCU, Romania — Recently, medical specialists from U.S. Navy Forces Europe-Naval Forces Africa staged a unique field emergency room drill with counterparts from the Swedish armed forces during exercise Vigorous Warrior 19, Cincu Military Base, Romania.

The scenario, which integrated U.S. Navy personnel into operations of a Swedish field hospital (termed a “Role 2” basic facility under NATO doctrine), exemplified the unique opportunity Vigorous Warrior provides to test multinational cooperation in a dynamic environment.

Vigorous Warrior is a biannual readiness event organized by the NATO Military Medicine Centre of Excellence, headquartered in Budapest, Romania. With more than 2,500 participants, Vigorous Warrior 19 is NATO’s largest-ever medical exercise.

“We had a simulated blast injury that was a critical patient with significant trauma,” said Navy Cmdr. Corey Gustafson, emergency room physician, U.S. Navy Hospital, Naples. “Based on what we were seeing in the trauma bay, I consulted with my Swedish colleague who agreed to bring the patient into the operating room. After that, our U.S. anesthesiologist and surgical technician went with the Swedish surgeon into the operating room and operated on the case.”

According to Gustafson, the drill was a teachable moment for counterparts from very different backgrounds.

Navy Cmdr. Corey Gustafson (center right) and Capt. Martin Stenerös (center left), Swedish armed forces, participate in a multinational medical drill, Cincu Military Base, Romania, during exercise Vigorous Warrior 19. Vigorous Warrior 19 is NATO’s largest-ever military medical exercise, uniting more than 2,500 participants from 39 countries to exercise experimental doctrinal concepts and test their medical assets together in a dynamic, multinational environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt. Andrew Layton).
Navy Cmdr. Corey Gustafson (center right) and Capt. Martin Stenerös (center left), Swedish armed forces, participate in a multinational medical drill, Cincu Military Base, Romania, during exercise Vigorous Warrior 19. Vigorous Warrior 19 is NATO’s largest-ever military medical exercise, uniting more than 2,500 participants from 39 countries to exercise experimental doctrinal concepts and test their medical assets together in a dynamic, multinational environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt. Andrew Layton).

“For me as a provider, there were several things this morning that will ultimately help increase my scope of care,” Gustafson said. “I learned new things about centralized points of access for intravenous therapy (IVs); also seeing how the Swedes are interoperable within their own trauma team, to the point that even their doctors know how to run the x-ray machine – this concept was something that was very new to us.”

After the drills were complete, the rapport forged between Gustafson and his counterpart, Capt. Martin Stenerös, trauma surgeon, Swedish armed forces, was evident.

“Working together, communicating with each other hasn’t been any problem whatsoever,” Stenerös said. “I worked with both Corey and the American intensive care nurse very well, although there were different nuances in our techniques which I think were very good to learn from.”

What made the scenario even more unique was that it was planned with almost no notice. Only the day before had Gustafson first reached out to the Swedish team on a whim.

“On my father’s side, I’m Swedish, so naturally I had a curiosity and I wanted to come visit the Swedish Role 2 basic tent here at Vigorous Warrior,” Gustafson said. “I asked my Swedish colleagues if they were amenable to us augmenting them since this is a concept that we’re looking at developing in the NAVEUR theater, and they were very open to working with us.”

Before the drills began, Gustafson and his team of 11 Sailors had time only for brief introductions and a tour of their Nordic partners’ Role 2 basic facility. For Gustafson, the fact that the cooperation was agreed upon at the spur of the moment added its own value to the experience.

“To me, this is a demonstration of dynamic force employment in what I think was a very realistic scenario,” Gustafson said. “It proves that at NAVEUR-NAVAF, if we were to have a Role 2 light maneuver-like capability, we could augment NATO forces or partner country forces with agility and be very effective with very short notice.”

The experience was so positive for the combined team that when the first blast injury scenario was complete, the U.S. personnel continued working with the Swedes for six more casualty drills and planned to work together again the following day.

“After the first scenario, we realized that we operated very similarly, so we decided to integrate teams,” said Gustafson. “We had two teams led by a Swedish surgeon with two Americans; meanwhile, I followed Martin around and tried to maintain an overall cognizance of patient flow.”

Together, the multinational team also practiced the aerial evacuation of a critically-wounded patient to a Role 3 facility for secondary surgeries.

Beyond its value from as a professional exchange , the scenario illustrated the strategic value of multinational exercises in rehearsing the overall coordination between allies and partner militaries in times of crisis.

“What we did today with our partners from the U.S. shows what we can do together, with a few extra hands,” said Stenerös. “It’s nice to know we can help each other in a situation where we may need to work together in the real world.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity.  Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Coronavirus: What you need to know

Article
3/6/2020
A Guardsmen with the 341st Military Intelligence Battalion conducts translation work on a safety message regarding the best practices for avoiding the novel coronavirus for the Washington Department of Health on Feb. 9, 2020 at the Information Operations Readiness Center, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. (Courtesy Photo)

Although news stories and images contain many reports of people wearing surgical masks to ward off the virus, that's not recommended

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

MHS prepared to support interagency coronavirus response

Article
2/6/2020
Airmen assist one another in donning their personal protective equipment, while on-board an Air Force C-17 Globemaster III during transportation isolation system training at Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina. Engineered and implemented after the Ebola virus outbreak in 2014, the TIS is an enclosure the Department of Defense can use to safely transport patients with diseases like novel coronavirus. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller)

From R&D to force health protection, MHS protects DoD personnel and families

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

DoD releases guidance to protect forces from novel coronavirus

Article
1/31/2020
The novel coronavirus is a variant of other coronaviruses, such as this colorized transmission electron micrograph of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) virus particles (blue) found near the periphery of an infected VERO E6 cell (yellow). Image captured and color-enhanced at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility in Fort Detrick, Maryland. (Photo by NIAID)

Basic infection controls offer best defense against illness

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

Coronavirus: What providers, patients should know

Article
1/24/2020
Many forms of coronavirus exist among both humans and animals, but this new strain’s has caused alarm. (CDC graphic)

What to do now that virus has appeared in U.S.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Public Health | Coronavirus | Global Health Engagement | Coronavirus

DTRA contributes to historic Ebola vaccine effort

Article
1/17/2020
Air Force Staff Sgt. Lee Nembhard, an aeromedical evacuation technician assigned to the 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron from Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, straps a simulated Ebola patient to a litter during a Transport Isolation System training exercise at Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Megan Munoz)

U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves new Ebola vaccine

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Immunizations | Global Emerging Infections Surveillance | Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

Air Force International Health Specialist builds medical capability in Iraq

Article
12/30/2019
U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Jessica Cowden, Infectious Disease Programs chief with the Defense Institute for Medical Operations, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, poses for a photo with the NATO Mission Iraq Embedded Training Team during the Combined Joint Task Force - Operation Inherent Resolve, June 25, 2019. (Photo By Josh Mahler)

Cowden’s work facilitated the exchange of medical knowledge and practices between Kurdish and Iraqi security forces.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

Global Health Engagement strengthens partnerships

Article
12/20/2019
U.S. Navy Capt. Michael Sullivan, a pediatrician assigned to the hospital ship USNS Comfort, gives a sticker to a two-year-old boy after examining his skin infection at a temporary medical treatment site in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti. During Comfort’s deployment, the crew worked with health and government partners in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean to provide care on the ship and at a temporary medical treatment site, helping to relieve pressure on national medical systems, including those strained by an increase in cross-border migrants. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Maria G. Llanos)

GHE advances U.S. national security interests around the world

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

Ship-based Global Health Engagement

Article
12/4/2019
Navy Capt. Heather King, executive director of the TriService Nursing Research Program at the Uniformed Services University, details the process of ship-based global health engagement missions during the October 22, 2019, Medical Museum Science Café titled "Ship-Based Global Health Engagement Missions: Expanding Global Partnerships" at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring, Maryland. (NMHM photo)

Global health engagement is an important priority for military medicine

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | National Museum of Health and Medicine | Global Health Engagement

Network of researchers advancing warfighter readiness

Article
12/4/2019
Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee Payne, the assistant director for Combat Support at DHA, delivered the keynote address at the Global Emerging Infections Surveillance Scientific and Programmatic Advancement Meeting, GSPAM. He emphasized the importance of Force Health Protection measures and linked the GEIS mission to DHA’s combat support mission. (DoD photo)

In fiscal year 2020, GEIS awarded approximately $60 million to more than 20 DoD laboratories and U.S. government partners

Recommended Content:

Combat Support | Global Health Engagement | Global Emerging Infections Surveillance

World AIDS Day puts spotlight on landmark DoD study

Article
12/2/2019
Dr. John Mascola, director of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center, discusses HIV vaccine progress at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Nov. 26, during a World AIDS Day commemoration.  (U.S. Army photo)

Vaccine study shows infection risk lowered by 31 percent, offering hope for future

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Research and Innovation | Global Health Engagement

USNS Comfort strengthens partnership with Jamaica

Article
11/7/2019
Navy Cmdr. Sara Naczas, a nurse assigned to the hospital ship USNS Comfort, helps a boy roll his yo-yo at a temporary medical treatment site in Kingston, Jamaica. Comfort is working with health and government partners in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean to provide care on the ship and at a temporary medical treatment site, helping to relieve pressure on national medical systems, including those strained by an increase in cross-border migrants. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Maria G. Llanos)

This marks the Comfort’s third visit to Jamaica

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

Honduran MEDRETEs provide invaluable surgical, training opportunities

Article
10/30/2019
Air Force Maj. Julia Nuelle, chief of Orthopaedic Hand and Microvascular Surgery at Brooke Army Medical Center, poses for a photo with a pediatric patient and her mother during a Medical Readiness Exercise in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The team finished their mission by visiting their patients and delivering toys and coloring books to the hospital's pediatric ward. (Courtesy photo by Army Lt. Col. Lori Tapley)

MEDRETEs play a critical role in the training and readiness of military medical personnel

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

Comfort strengthens partnership following successful medical mission

Article
10/21/2019
Navy Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Benjamin Lazarus flies in an MH-60S Seahawk assigned to the “Dragon Whales” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28, as it transports supplies from the hospital ship USNS Comfort for a temporary medical treatment site in Basseterre, St. Kitts and Nevis. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Morgan K. Nall)

More than 800 medical professionals provided care for 3,677 patients

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

Comfort strengthens partnership with Grenada

Article
9/27/2019
Surgical staff transports a woman into the post-anesthesia care unit following her surgery aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort as the ship is anchored off the coast of St. George's, Grenada. Comfort is working with health and government partners in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean to provide care on the ship and at land-based medical sites, helping to relieve pressure on national healthcare systems, including those strained by an increase in cross-border migrants. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Morgan K. Nall)

This marks the first visit to Grenada and the seventh to the region since 2007

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

U.S. builds bonds in Papua New Guinea

Article
9/17/2019
Navy Lt. Austin Stokes, (right), and Air Force Maj. Nicole Smith (center), both dentists, talk to a patient at the Pacific Angel 19-4 health outreach site in Lae, Papua New Guinea. The health outreach site is comprised of five clinics including primary care, optometry, dental, physical therapy and pharmacy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

This is the second Pacific Angel exercise conducted in Papua New Guinea

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Global Health Engagement
<< < 1 2 3 4 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 4

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.