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Take Command of your health during Men’s Health Month

Take Command of Your Health Take Command of Your Health

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Men's Health

Men, are you taking command of your health? Taking command of your health means making positive decisions each day that contribute to your overall physical and mental wellness.

Men’s Health Month is a great time to focus on taking preventive steps and making small changes to your lifestyle. You can start by getting familiar with the preventive services that TRICARE covers and health issues that more frequently affect men. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the leading cause of death among men in the U.S. is heart disease. Some of the factors that lead to heart disease and stroke are preventable, especially with early detection and timely treatment.

Here are a few tips for men to get and stay healthy, happy, and strong: 

  • Visit Your Doctor - Make an appointment. A yearly Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Examination is covered if enrolled in TRICARE Prime or TRICARE Select. TRICARE covers clinical preventive screenings. Your doctor can help you decide what tests you need based on your age and risk factors. Some important health tests for men include:
    • Blood pressure and cardiovascular screenings
    • Colorectal, prostate, testicular, and skin cancer exams
  • Develop a Good Relationship with Your Provider - During your visits, be honest about your health concerns. Open communication can prevent misdiagnoses and unnecessary tests. Use these tips for talking to your doctor from the National Institutes of Health before your next appointment. And if you don’t have a primary care manager or need help finding a doctor, use Find a Doctor on the TRICARE website.
  • Be Aware of Signs and Symptoms - Notice potential health concerns, beyond when you’re sick or injured. Pay attention to that mole, persistent cough, or other symptom that seems new or unusual. Get familiar with your family’s health history. Your provider can assess your risk of disease based on your family history and other factors.
  • Develop a Healthy Lifestyle - Exercise regularly, get enough sleep, and eat healthy balanced meals to stay in control of your mental and physical health. If you feel depressed, seek help. Your doctor can help you identify problems, like being overweight or feeling anxious. Learn about mental health services that TRICARE covers.

This June, take steps to get healthy, schedule the health care visits you need, and take command of your health. Go to the Military Health System Men’s Health Month spotlight to learn more about health issues important to men.

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Routine Screening for HIV Antibodies Among Male Civilian Applicants

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3/24/2017
This graphic shows the results of routine screening for antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among both male civilian applicants for U.S. military service and male service members of the U.S. Armed Forces, active component - Army during  January 2015 through June 2016 surveillance period. 368,369 males out of 463,132 civilian applicants for U.S. military service were tested for antibodies to HIV. Out of 124 civilian applicants that were HIV positive, 114 were male. Throughout the period, seroprevalences were much higher among males than females.  As for U.S. Armed Forces active component, 467,011 male service members out of 548,974 were tested for antibodies to HIV. Out of 120 soldiers that were HIV positive 117 were male. Annual seroprevalences for male active component Army members greatly exceed those of females. During the 2015, on average, one new HIV infection was detected among active duty army soldiers per 5,265 screening tests.  HIV-1 is the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. Of 515 active component soldiers diagnosed with HIV infections since 2011, a total of 291 (57%) were still in the military. Get tested and learn more by reading the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report at Health.Mil/MSMR.

Since October 1985, the U.S. military has conducted routine screening for antibodies to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to enable adequate, timely medical evaluations, treatment and counseling, and protect the battlefield blood supply. This infographic provides information on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among male civilian applicants of the U.S. Military Service and U.S. Armed Forces, January 2011 – June 2016.

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5 Major Categories of Abdominal Hernia

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3/17/2017
An abdominal hernia is an abnormal protrusion of an organ or tissue through a defect in the abdominal wall. This infographic provides information on incident diagnoses of the five types of abdominal hernia that were documented in health records of 72,404 active component service members from 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014.  A total of 87,480 incident diagnoses of the five types of abdominal hernia were documented in health records of 72,404 active component service members. Here are highlights of the findings from this study: •	The give types of abdominal hernia categories used in this analysis were: inguinal, umbilical ventral/ incisional, femoral and “other.” •	 During the 10-year interval, incidence rates for most of the five types of hernia trended downward but increased for umbilical hernias in both males and females and ventral/ incisional hernias among females. •	Overall incidence rate of inguinal hernias among males was six times the rate among females. •	Incidence rates of femoral, ventral/ incisional and umbilical hernias were higher among females than males. •	For most types of hernia incidence rates tend to be higher among older age groups.  Abdominal hernias are diagnosed most frequently in the inguinal, umbilical, and femoral regions, but another category of relatively common hernias of the anterior abdominal wall includes ventral and incisional hernias. Health records contained documentation for 35,624 surgical procedures whose description corresponded to the types of hernia diagnoses in U.S. military service members. Learn more about the findings of the study at Health.mil/MSMR

An abdominal hernia is an abnormal protrusion of an organ or tissue through a defect in the abdominal wall. This infographic provides information on incident diagnoses of the five types of abdominal hernia that were documented in health records of 72,404 active component service members from 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014.

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Heart Disease and Its Effects on Service Members

Infographic
6/8/2016
infographic about heart disease and its effect on service members

Cardiovascular disease comprises disorders of the heart and circulatory system including coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. This infographic provides data on the risk factors for cardiovascular disease among military members base on diagnostic codes in the electronic health records of service members during a 10-year surveillance period.

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The HPV Vaccine Saves Lives

Infographic
5/16/2016
The Defense Department recommends male and female military service members, ages 17-26 years, receive an HPV vaccine series to generate a robust immune response to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4). This graphic highlights information the benefits of the HPV vaccine. The vaccine is most effective among fully vaccinated individuals.   Cancer Prevention Facts •	HPV is the most common sexually  transmitted infection (STI) •	There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas •	Some HPV types give warts •	Some HPV types develop cancer  Effective Against STI Transmission •	The HPV vaccine is a safe and effective way to protect yourself from the virus •	The HPV vaccine provides nearly 100% protection from HPV types 6,11,16 and 18 •	HPV vaccine shows early signs of success in reducing HPV infections and related illnesses •	Protection is expected to be long-lasting  Safety Tips •	Getting your HPV vaccine and practicing safe sex such as wearing a condom may lower the risk of HPV •	Limiting the number of lifetime sex partners can also lower the risk of HPV •	When given the HPV vaccine, the body makes antibodies in response to the protection to clear it from the body  Get the Facts •	2,091 female service members aged 17-26 years received 1-3 HPV4 doses during 2006-2012, stratified by number of doses (1, 2, or 3).  Get the HPV Vaccine •	Only 22.5% of eligible service members initiated the series •	Of those, only 39.1% completed the full three-dose series as of June 2011.  Even though the 3 dose regiment provides nearly complete protection against HPV16 and HPV18, in the U.S., only 12% and 19% of female adolescents among commercial and Medicaid plans respectively complete the series.  Read HPV Facts from the CDC: https://www.ok.gov/health2/documents/IMM_Teens_HPV_Facts.pdf  Read the STI issue of the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report at Health.Mil/MSMR   Get the conversation started. Ask your healthcare provider about the HPV vaccine today. Follow us on Twitter @AFHSBPAGE and use hashtag #VaccinesWork.

The Defense Department recommends male and female military service members, ages 17-26 years, receive an HPV vaccine series to generate a robust immune response to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4).

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