Back to Top Skip to main content

Air Force Medical Service unveils new model for active duty care

Air Force Medical Service logo (MHS graphic) Air Force Medical Service logo (MHS graphic)

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

FALLS CHURCH, Va. —  In an effort to return more Airmen to duty quicker, the Air Force is rolling out a new medical model to restore the overall readiness of our military.

Under the new Air Force Medical Reform model, dedicated provider care teams will be aligned to an Operational Medical Readiness Squadron primarily focused on proactively treating active duty Airmen and improving their availability to support the warfighting mission. Care for non-active duty patients, primarily the families of service members and military retirees, will be handled by separate provider teams aligned to a Health Care Operations Squadron.

“This new structure optimizes both functions and allows us to return airmen back to full mission capability as quickly as possible without decrementing care to our beneficiaries,” said Air Force Lt. Col. Robert Corby, chief of Medical Manpower and Personnel, Office of the Air Force Surgeon General. “Restructuring where care is delivered lets our providers focus on each group to improve the quality of care, create efficiencies, and most importantly, get injured or ill Airmen back into the fight more quickly.”

The model is based on a pilot the 366th Medical Group, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho began in summer 2018. The group reorganized into two squadrons with the goal of returning Airmen to duty as quickly as possible.

The pilot initially launched as part a wing-wide initiative for the 366th Fighter Wing. Since the initial rollout, the 366th MDG has seen promising results.

“We had more than 400 Airmen on the base who were considered “non-mission capable” when we launched in March 2018,” said Air Force Col. Steven Ward, the 366th MDG commander. “In six months, we reduced that number by nearly one-fourth. Our provider teams focused relentlessly on getting Airmen back into the fight.”

Provider teams were able to holistically treat Airmen instead of waiting for an Airman to seek out care. They visit with Airmen in their duty locations to understand the personal and workplace challenges they face, and partner with unit leaders to proactively manage Airmen’s care and minimize downtime.

“It was a real culture change for our provider teams, focusing just on Airmen and building relationships with their assigned squadron and leadership,” said Ward. “That narrow focus really helps providers get to know their patients and solve health problems before they can negatively affect the mission.”

The renewed focus on readiness and returning Airmen to duty goes hand-in-hand with other reform efforts within the Air Force Medical Service and the Military Health System. Corby emphasized cooperation with the Defense Health Agency, as they assume a larger role at Military Treatment Facilities.

“As we become a more integrated enterprise, it’s very important for us to learn from each other,” said Corby. “The current version of Air Force Medical Reform isn’t final. It will continue to evolve as we roll it out to other locations, and get a better understanding of each Active Duty population’s specific needs.”

The AFMS plans to initially rollout the new medical organization model to 43 Air Force MTF within the continental United States. Medical centers, hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, graduate medical education facilities, overseas MTFs, and limited scope facilities will not initially move to the new organizational model.

The next phase of Medical Health System reforms will administratively transition the MTFs of all military services to DHA responsibility Oct. 1, 2019.

You also may be interested in...

Changes to military health care system aimed at readiness

Article
12/6/2019
Speaking before the House Armed Services subcommittee on personnel during a Dec. 5 hearing on Capitol Hill, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Thomas McCaffrey (left), Army Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Ronald Place (second from left), director of the DHA, the service Surgeons General, and Joint Staff Surgeon outlined the necessity for the health care system to change in order to support warfighter readiness. (MHS photo)

Merger of all hospitals and clinics to DHA a key step

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Military hospital transformation – introducing the market construct

Article
12/5/2019
Barclay Butler, Ph.D., MBA, assistant director of management at DHA, explains the market concept to an audience of active-duty and civilian conference attendees at the 2019 AMSUS Annual Meeting in National Harbor, Maryland, Dec. 4. (Photo by MHS Communications)

Markets will manage hospital and clinic needs within a geographic region

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | MHS Transformation

McCaffery calls for military medical strategic framework for warfighting readiness

Article
12/5/2019
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery speaks on Thursday at the annual meeting of AMSUS, the Society of Federal Health Professionals. McCaffery announced to the nearly 2,000 conference attendees that he has asked the Military Health System's senior leadership to develop and codify a formal strategic framework to guide integrating and optimizing all MHS components to meet his vision. (MHS photo)

'New reality' includes tight synchronization, expanding partnerships

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | MHS Transformation

Tri-Service surgeons perform the first surgeries at new hospital

Article
12/3/2019
The Army, Navy and Air Force surgeons and physician assistant met with the hospital command team. (Left to right) Army Col. Alfonso Alarcon, orthopedic surgeon at BDAACH; Army Maj. Harry Aubin, general surgeon at BDAACH; Army Command Sgt. Maj. Nicole Haines, the hospital senior enlisted advisor; Air Force Capt. Christopher Ng, Air Force general surgeon with 51st MDG; Army Maj. Eric de la Cruz, chief of general surgery at BDAACH; Navy Lt. Cmdr. Paul Lewis and Lt. Cmdr. Dan Sanford, general surgeons with 3rd Medical Battalion; Army Maj. John Fletcher, general surgeon at BDAACH; Army Col. Andrew L. Landers, hospital commander, and Air Force Capt. Steven Maya, physician assistant with 51st MDG. (U.S. Army photo by Inkyeong Yun)

This event showcased the collaboration amongst the tri-service general surgeons

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | MHS Transformation

NMCP hosts ‘The Future of Military Medicine’ discussion panel

Article
12/3/2019
Navy Capt. Joel Schofer, deputy chief of the Medical Corps at the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, talks about the Defense Health Agency transition during Naval Medical Center Portsmouth’s Future of Military Medicine panel. The panel participants were (left to right) Schofer, deputy chief of the Medical Corps at the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Navy Capt. Lisa Mulligan, NMCP’s commanding officer and Capt. Guido Valdes, Navy Medicine East deputy commander (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Imani N. Daniels)

The readiness of the Navy Medicine team is paramount to combat survival in the future

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Air Force transitions all U.S. military treatment facilities to DHA administration, management

Article
10/31/2019
This October, U.S.-based Air Force military treatment facilities transferred administration and management to the Defense Health Agency. (U.S. Air Force illustration)

Congress directed this transfer in the fiscal year 2017 National Defense Authorization Act

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

DHA's management of hospitals and clinics 'all about the patient'

Article
10/29/2019
Great outcomes, a ready medical force, satisfied patients – all flow directly from a patient-centered approach. As DHA assumes responsibility for military health care facilities across the entire Department of Defense, we aim to operate each hospital and clinic so that it improves the lives and health of our patients. It’s more than a pledge – it’s our mission. (DoD photo)

Great outcomes, a ready medical force, satisfied patients

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Continuing Implementation of the Reform of the Military Health System

Policy

This memorandum directs the continued implementation of the Military Health System (MHS) organizational reform required by 10 U.S.C. § 1073c, and sections 71 land 712 of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2019. The DoD policy for this reform is guided by the goals of improved readiness, better health, better care, and lower cost. The Department will advance these objectives through specific organizational reforms directed by Congress and the continued direction of the Secretary of Defense·anct the National Defense Strategy.

Naval Hospital Pensacola transitions to DHA, stands up readiness training commands

Article
9/20/2019
Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Joren Seibert uses cryotherapy for wart removal at Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville’s primary care. Seibert, a native of Galesburg, Illinois, says, “I started in the Navy as a deck seaman and can now proudly say I’m a hospital corpsman. The people we care for deserve nothing but the best. Being able to directly help those folks every day is what keeps me coming back and what motivates me to continue being a better corpsman." (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

To support the transition, Navy Medicine is establishing a co-located readiness and training command

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

New DHA director visits Europe, talks military healthcare consolidation

Article
9/18/2019
Army Lt. Gen. Ronald Place (center), director of the Defense Health Agency, talks to two civilian staff personnel during a recent visited the U.S. Army Health Clinic Stuttgart, Sept. 11, 2019, Stuttgart, Germany. The Department of Defense is preparing for the next major step in consolidating military hospitals and clinics under a single agency, one of the largest organizational changes within the U.S. military in decades. (U.S. Army photo by Rey Ramon)

The standardization process...will be applied across all aspects of healthcare and will ensure more consistency throughout the services

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

A change in leadership for the Defense Health Agency

Article
9/3/2019
Army Lt. Gen. Ronald Place, the incoming director of the Defense Health Agency, previously served in DHA as director of the National Capital Region Medical Directorate, the transitional Intermediate Management Organization, and the interim assistant director for health care administration. (MHS photo)

Army Lt. Gen. Place installed as third director

Recommended Content:

Defense Health Agency | MHS GENESIS | MHS Transformation

McCaffery sworn in as new ASDHA

Article
8/29/2019
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Thomas McCaffery was formally sworn into office on August 28, 2019

He will oversee the transfer of management of hundreds of military hospitals and clinics from the Army, Navy and Air Force to the Defense Health Agency

Recommended Content:

Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs | Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs | Defense Health Agency | MHS Transformation

Military health care consolidation moves to next phase

Article
8/28/2019
Jennifer Oubre, a certified mammogram technician at Naval Health Clinic Corpus Christi in Texas, validates a patient’s identity to prevent wrong-patient error prior to administering a mammogram. (U.S. Navy photo by Bill W. Love)

Eventually every military treatment facility will move under the DHA

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

DoD to begin next major phase of military hospital consolidation

Article
8/26/2019
Lt. Col. Juli Fung-Hayes (center), a U.S. Army Reserve emergency medicine physician with the 2nd Medical Brigade, leads a medic team from the 396th Combat Support Hospital, headquartered at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, through a trauma and critical care scenario in a field hospital during a promotional photo shoot for Army Reserve marketing and recruiting at Fort Hunter Liggett, California, July 18, 2018. (U.S. Army Reserve photo by Master Sgt. Michel Sauret)

Congress mandated that a single agency will be responsible for the administration and management of all military hospitals and clinics

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Defense Health Agency

Officials discuss Blanchfield Hospital’s future as transition nears

Article
8/15/2019
Army Maj. Gen. Ron Place, who was recently confirmed for promotion to lieutenant general and selected to serve as the next director of DHA, visited Blanchfield Army Community Hospital and Fort Campbell, Kentucky, Aug. 7 for more discussion about the hospital’s transition to DHA Oct. 1. (U.S. Army photo)

Supporting forces remains the number one priority of the Defense Health Agency

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < 1 2 3 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 3

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.