Back to Top Skip to main content

Maxwell AFB’s medical group reorganizes, improves health care

Air Force Medical Service seal Air Force Medical Service seal

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. — The 42nd Medical Group reorganized and re-designated two of its squadrons as part of the Air Force’s new medical group reform model.

In a ceremony held Aug. 5, 2019, the 42nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron was re-designated the 42nd Operational Medical Readiness Squadron, and the 42nd Medical Operations Squadron re-designated the 42nd Health Care Operations Squadron.

The goal of the organizational changes is to codify the resources required to maximize Airmen readiness and availability for deployments and to maintain the medical group’s “ready medic” mission while providing top-quality care to all beneficiaries, said 42nd Medical Group Commander Air Force Col. Jeanette Frantal.

“The OMRS and HCOS are intended to be interconnected and complementary, allowing their synergy to produce the best potential to achieve full-spectrum medical readiness,” she said. “Organizing within this construct will provide opportunities to develop workflow practices tailored toward serving these independent patient categories.”

The 42nd Operational Medical Readiness Squadron will focus primarily on proactive treatment of active duty service members to improve their availability in supporting the warfighting mission.

“As an expeditionary force, the Air Force Medical Service must maintain the Air Force’s most valuable weapon system: its Airmen,” said Air Force Lt. Col. Scott Corey, OMRS commander. “To do that, the OMRS will empanel active duty members with a focus on the medical readiness posture and availability of our expeditionary forces and getting ‘downed Airmen’ back in the fight.”

The 42nd Health Care Operations Squadron will provide quality care for non-active duty, families of service members and military retirees.

“The changes that are occurring are organizational, not functional,” said Air Force Lt. Col. Melissa Runge, HCOS commander. “There will be no effect on how our beneficiaries receive care in the Military Health System. The care they receive will remain the same.”

In addition to the 42nd Medical Group, the Air Force Medical Service is transforming 42 other military treatment facilities within the continental United States. The next phase of Military Health System reforms will administratively transition the MTFs of all military services to Defense Health Agency responsibility by Oct. 1, 2019.

“The bottom line for all these changes,” said Frantal, “is that we will still provide the same outstanding medical care that we’ve always provided. Other than beneficiaries potentially being assigned different primary care managers, the adjustments should be fairly unremarkable to everyone.”

The Defense Health Agency is a joint, integrated Combat Support Agency that enables the Army, Navy and Air Force medical services to provide a medically ready force and a ready medical force to combatant commands in both peacetime and wartime.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

McCaffery offers MHS view with Blue Star Families panel

Article
2/28/2020
Thomas McCaffery (center) participated in the Blue Star Families Panel at American Red Cross National Headquarters Feb. 26. He is seen here with Amy Goyer (left), family and caregiving expert at AARP, and retired Army Lt. Gen. Patty Horoho (right), CEO of OptumServe. The panel discussed timely, quality health care for service members and their families. (Photo by MHS Communications)

The Honorable Thomas McCaffery participated in the Blue Star Families panel to discuss MHS transformation for families

Recommended Content:

Access to Health Care | MHS Transformation | MHS GENESIS | Mental Health Care

DHA Director discusses vision for future

Article
2/25/2020
Lt. Gen. Ronald Place, Director, Defense Health Agency, visits with the staff of the Stuttgart Army Health Clinic in Germany.  Since becoming DHA Director, Lt. Gen. Place has focused on creating great outcomes for the beneficiaries who rely on the Military Health System for their health care.

DHA is providing a more integrated system of readiness and health

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

McCaffery announces upcoming changes to military hospitals, clinics

Article
2/19/2020
The Honorable Tom McCaffery, DoD's assistant secretary of defense for health affairs emphasized DoD's priority is to focus on wartime readiness while ensuring continued beneficiary access to quality health care. (DoD photo)

McCaffery emphasized DoD's priority is to focus on wartime readiness while ensuring continued beneficiary access to quality health care

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

Careful, deliberate changes ahead for select MTFs

Article
2/19/2020
The Department of Defense today announced plans to restructure 50 military hospitals and clinics to better support wartime readiness of military personnel and to improve clinical training for medical forces who deploy in support of combat operations around the world. Of the 343 facilities in the United States initially screened for this report, 77 were selected for additional assessment, with 21 identified for no changes. (DoD file photo)

The DoD’s top health official shared plans to restructure 50 military hospitals and clinics, emphasizing changes will prioritize the warfighter and force readiness

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

DoD to restructure 50 hospitals, clinics to improve readiness

Article
2/19/2020
The Department of Defense today announced plans to restructure 50 military hospitals and clinics to better support wartime readiness of military personnel and to improve clinical training for medical forces who deploy in support of combat operations around the world. (DoD file photo)

The restructuring effort focused on strengthening the prime responsibility of military medical facilities for training medical personnel

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

Building, sustaining combat readiness through basic first aid

Article
2/12/2020
Sailors treat a patient with simulated chest and arm wounds during a general quarters drill aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Kashif Basharat)

A skill that every Sailor on the ship should be able to perform is a basic trauma assessment

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Top military hospitals to set bar for surgical care in MHS

Article
2/7/2020
Surgical care within the Military Health System helps build and maintain a ready medical force. Results from the adult ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program assist the MHS in creating policy and verifying surgical skills throughout the enterprise's military hospitals. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mike DiMestico/Released)

The Military Health System uses the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to better inform surgical standards.

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

Jacksonville Market strengthens medical readiness, patients’ health

Article
2/5/2020
Dr. Barclay Butler, Defense Health Agency's assistant director for management, Navy Rear Adm. Anne Swap, commander, Naval Medical Forces Atlantic, and Navy Capt. Matthew Case, commander of Naval Hospital Jacksonville and commanding officer of Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Jacksonville, discuss the Jacksonville Market with community partners at the hospital. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel, Naval Hospital Jacksonville)

The Jacksonville Market serves 163,000 beneficiaries, including about 72,000 who are enrolled with a primary care manager

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Army Medicine senior leaders meet to map out medical transformation

Article
1/31/2020
Key leaders at the Army Medicine Senior Leader Forum watch Lt. Gen. R. Scott Dingle, Army Surgeon General, at podium during the Army Medicine Senior Leaders Forum on Jan. 28, 2020, to discuss issues related to the transformation of Army Medicine and how to manage the way ahead to ensure optimal medical readiness for soldiers and all military medical beneficiaries. Attendees include the Director of the Defense Health Agency, Army  Lt. Gen. Ronald Place (left foreground), and Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) Thomas McCaffery (center foreground). The forum was held at Fort Belvoir and involved about 350 leaders. (U.S. Army photo by Jenie Fisher)

Since World War II, of 18 studies on the military health services, almost all recommended consolidating the three into a single health care organization

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

DHA stands up first four health care markets

Article
1/30/2020
By standardizing care and administrative functions within military medical facilities, DoD seeks to create a more medically ready force; one that provides safe, high-quality health care to service members, their families, and retirees and ensures the readiness of medical personnel who provide that care.  (Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jacob Sippel)

Military Medical Facilities in much of the U.S. will share resources

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Army, FDA discuss 3D printing at workshop

Article
1/21/2020
When a medical device breaks down on a medical unit deployed to a remote part of the world, the closest repair parts could be thousands of miles away (U.S. Army photo by Francis S. Trachta)

Army medical logisticians are looking to 3D printing as a potential solution to this challenge

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Technology | Combat Support | Medical Logistics

Transition spotlight: Air Force Medical Service, part 2

Article
1/16/2020
Air Force Maj. Nicole Ward (left) and Air Force Capt. Matthew Muncey, program managers with the Air Force Medical Service Transition Cell, pose for a photo at the Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Josh Mahler)

Two officers speak about standing up DHA’s new capabilities to manage MTFs, ensuring the process is as smooth as possible for personnel and patients

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

DHA director visits Colorado, discusses medical transition

Article
1/15/2020
Defense Health Agency Director Lt. Gen. Ronald Place speaks to Evans Army Community Hospital leaders at BK George Hall about the Military Health System transformation. Place visited military medical teams at Peterson Air Force Base, the U.S. Air Force Academy and Buckley Air Force Base, which also encompass the Colorado Springs Military Health System. (Photo by Jeanine Mezei)

Colorado Springs currently exists in an enhanced multi-service market

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

Transition spotlight: Air Force Medical Service

Article
1/13/2020
Air Force Maj. Nicole Ward, left, and Capt. Matthew Muncey, program managers with the Air Force Medical Service Transition Cell, at the Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia, Jan. 9, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by Josh Mahler)

Two Airmen deeply are involved with the process of standing up DHA’s new capabilities to manage MTFs

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation

U.S. Transportation Command: DoD’s manager for global patient movement

Article
1/9/2020
An ambulance bus backs up to the Mississippi Air National Guard C-17 Globemaster III as Airmen prepare to unload patients at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland. The bus transports the ill and/or injured to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. JBA and Travis Air Force Base, California, serve as the primary military entry points or hubs for patient distribution within the continental United States. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis)

On a weekly basis, USTRANSCOM moves up to 40 patients from overseas to CONUS

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 8

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing | Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.