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Navy Medicine researchers kick off 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium with strong showing

Navy Medicine West Commander Rear Adm. Tim Weber (right) discusses research findings with scientists from Navy Medicine's hospitals and research labs during the first poster session at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium. (U.S. Navy photo By Regena Kowitz) Navy Medicine West Commander Rear Adm. Tim Weber (right) discusses research findings with scientists from Navy Medicine's hospitals and research labs during the first poster session at the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium. (U.S. Navy photo By Regena Kowitz)

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MHSRS 2019 | Research and Innovation

KISSIMMEE, Fla. — Navy Medicine researchers from across the globe convened Aug. 19 in for the start of the 2019 Military Health System Research Symposium to discuss the latest scientific advances and initiatives that support warfighter health, readiness and survivability.

MHSRS is the Department of Defense’s annual, four-day scientific meeting that provides a venue for presenting new scientific knowledge resulting from military research and development.

“This is really one of the best meetings that we have in the MHS that brings together techniques, research projects, and capabilities to the warfighter,” said Navy Rear Admiral Bruce Gillingham, director, Medical Resources, Plans and Policy, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. “It’s terrific to be here to support the work as we continue to focus on readiness for the Fleet and Marine Corps.”

This year, dozens of scientists from Navy military treatment facilities and medical research labs are presenting their work at two plenary sessions, speaking at more than 50 breakout sessions, and sharing more than 130 posters on research topics that include:

  • Surgical telementorship
  • Naval aviation survival training
  • Influenza vaccine effectiveness
  • Delayed amputation and limb salvage
  • Cognitive rehabilitation for the warfighter
  • Search and rescue patient transportation
  • Embedded mental health in operational settings

“This year, the real focus is on research for readiness,” said Navy Rear Admiral Darin Via, deputy chief of medical operations, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. “That’s looking at how we support the warfighter, from mental health conditions and infectious disease, to blood support, advanced surgical techniques and increasing survivability on the battlefield. It’s great to see Navy Medicine represented so well in a joint environment.”

Navy Capt. Adam Armstrong, Naval Medical Research Center commander, was on hand to support scientists from the eight medical research laboratories that conduct studies aimed at enhancing readiness and increasing the well-being of future forces. These labs are situated in locations around the world – from Singapore to Dayton, Ohio – where they focus on emerging infectious diseases, combat casualty care, injury prevention and rehabilitation, aerospace and undersea medicine, and more.

“One of the great things about MHSRS is that we can bring all of our eight labs and show how we have the ability to do a wide range of research in the Navy,” Armstrong said. “One of the major things we’re doing is bringing innovation, knowledge, and products to the warfighter to keep them in the fight and get them back into the fight.”

To learn more about MHSRS 2019, check out the Military Health System or the MHSRS website.

Navy Medicine West (NMW) leads Navy Medicine’s Western Pacific health care system and global research and development enterprise. Throughout the region, NMW provides medical care to nearly 700,000 beneficiaries across 10 naval hospitals, two dental battalions, and 51 branch clinics located throughout the West Coast of the U.S., Asia, and the Pacific. Globally, NMW oversees eight research laboratories that deliver research expertise in support of warfighter health and readiness.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

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