Back to Top Skip to main content

Keesler renovates cardiac cath lab to provide better, safer care

Air Force Staff Sgt. Matthew Slaven (right), 81st Medical Operations Squadron cardiopulmonary technician, briefs 81st Medical Group staff and guests on cath lab capabilities during the cardiac catheterization laboratory ribbon cutting ceremony inside Keesler Medical Center at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi. The lab was upgraded with an entire suite of technology to provide better and safer care for patients and the surgical team. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Suzie Plotnikov) Air Force Staff Sgt. Matthew Slaven (right), 81st Medical Operations Squadron cardiopulmonary technician, briefs 81st Medical Group staff and guests on cath lab capabilities during the cardiac catheterization laboratory ribbon cutting ceremony inside Keesler Medical Center at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi. The lab was upgraded with an entire suite of technology to provide better and safer care for patients and the surgical team. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Suzie Plotnikov)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss.Recently, the Keesler Cardiology Pulmonary Clinic had a ribbon cutting ceremony for their newly renovated cardiac catheterization laboratory.

In an approximately 10-month-process, the lab was upgraded with an entire suite of technology to provide better and safer care for patients as well as the surgical team.

“The new additions allow us to improve the provision of which we provide care and improve the safety of the procedures for our patients and for the operators who are exposing themselves to occupational radiation on a daily basis,” said Air Force Maj. Frank Russo, 81st Medical Operations Squadron cardiac catheterization laboratory director.

During operations, catheterization lab workers are required to have occupational monitoring of the radiation exposures and due to the high volume of procedures they perform, the radiation levels were high.

“What I’m seeing with our new technology is the ability to monitor our radiation levels in real time and be able to reduce the total radiation dose we receive as healthcare workers,” said Russo. “The amount of radiation our patients receive during the procedures has been much lower as well. Our new cath lab has a ten-fold reduction in radiation compared to what we were using previously.”

Historically, the Keesler Medical Center catheterization lab has been leading the way in cardiovascular care, not only in the Air Force and the Department of Defense, but locally as well, which was demonstrated when KMC implanted one of the first Micra Pacemakers in the state of Mississippi.

“Our demand for cardiology services here is great enough that we knew we would need to provide state of the art care,” said Russo. “Keesler has historically been a leader in providing high quality patient care and in order to continue to lead that effort, we had to upgrade and modernize our facilities to keep up with the technology and scope of services we provide.”

The upgrades offers multiple advancements in terms of radiation reduction, digitization of medical information as well as new capabilities which are more advanced than anything locally, said Air Force Lt. Col. William Pomeroy, 81st MDOS cardiologist. These advancements were necessary, he explained, as the cath lab has previously performed up to 2,000 procedures per year.

“Our image quality is far better than what we had been using,” said Russo. “We have the ability to incorporate different forms of technology into one suite for each room and have them communicate with each other to provide better patient care.”

Not only does the catheterization laboratory serve active duty members and retirees, the clinic has a joint DoD veteran’s partnership that dates back to 2007. Throughout the past five years, the lab has performed 5,600 procedures on Veteran Affairs patients which provided funding to the KMC facility as well as reduced the cost to the VA Medical Center as a whole.

These advancements also further the readiness of the medical and surgical specialties by enhancing the number and acuity of patients seen in the facility.

“We are providing services to a population that deserves high quality health care,” said Pomeroy. “We are investing in the future of this organization as well as the future of our healthcare for the veterans on the Gulf Coast.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Call to service: A transition from civilian to Army nurse

Article
5/9/2019
Army Capt. Lisa Kasper, an Emergency Room Nurse assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), inserts an intravenous needle into a patient during a training exercise at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. (U.S. Army photo by Maj. John Moore)

Serving as the only nurse in the brigade was very daunting

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | National Nurses Week

Mother's Day a chance to highlight care in the Military Health System

Article
5/8/2019
The Nunns with daughter Sabella and son Gideon. (Courtesy file photo)

The Military Health System helps deliver more than 100,000 babies each year

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Children's Health | Women's Health

William Beaumont Army Medical Center rivals prestigious cancer centers

Article
5/1/2019
Army Maj. Daniel Nelson, surgical oncologist and director of the Commission on Cancer at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, instructs medical residents during a bilateral mastectomy at WBAMC. Nelson, the only board-certified surgical oncologist in El Paso, is one of many physicians with advanced medical training, along with WBAMC’s Commission on Cancer, preparing medical residents for unconventional cases they may experience throughout their careers. (U.S. Army photo By Marcy Sanchez)

William Beaumont Army Medical Center has more than a half century of experience in providing cancer care

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Navy surgeon general addresses transition during visit to pacific northwest

Article
4/30/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Forrest Faison, Navy surgeon general and chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery takes time to share a few words with staff at Naval Hospital Bremerton's Urgent Care Clinic during his official visit at the command that included additional stops in the Pacific Northwest at Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor and Madigan Army Medical Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Douglas Stutz)

Navy Medicine and military medicine is in the midst of immense change and transition

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Pediatric medical services providers increase access to care for beneficiaries

Article
4/23/2019
Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Jason Caboot, pediatric pulmonologist, Madigan Army Medical Center, examines Jacob Schaff, an established pediatric specialty care patient at Naval Hospital Bremerton, Washington. The Schaff’s often find themselves traveling throughout the Puget Sound area to seek the specialty care Jacob requires. (U.S. Navy photo by Emily Yeh)

Pediatric medical services providers established a program that increases access to care for beneficiaries

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Children's Health

Changes coming to military medical treatment facilities

Article
4/22/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, Defense Health Agency director, speaks with members of the 42nd Medical Group about upcoming changes to military treatment facilities, at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. The DHA will be responsible for all facilities with respect to budgetary matters, information technology, health care administration and management, administrative policy and procedure and military medical construction. (U.S. Air Force photo by William Birchfield)

The DHA is as committed to the Air Force as the Air Force is to the DHA

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

New electronic health record integrates all aspects of care

Article
4/19/2019
Maj. Gen. Lee Payne (right) is escorted into Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms by hospital Commanding Officer, Capt. Nadji Hariri, for a site visit on the launch of MHS GENESIS, the military's new electronic record-keeping system, April 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Dave Marks)

Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee Payne and his team of military healthcare professionals visited Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms

Recommended Content:

MHS GENESIS | Military Health System Electronic Health Record | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Hospital Corpsmen graduate from trauma training program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville

Article
4/17/2019
Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Kyle Hamlin, an instructor for the hospital corpsman trauma training program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, helps motivate sailors during a Tactical Combat Casualty Care course. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

The Hospital Corpsman Trauma Training program furthers the Navy surgeon general’s goal to achieve maximum future life-saving capabilities

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

DHA ‘delivers’ nurses for babies

Article
4/16/2019
Air Force Col. Michelle Aastrom, 81st Inpatient Operation Squadron commander, discusses the intensive care unit capabilities with Army Maj. Gen. Ronald Place, Defense Health Agency, director, for the National Capital Region Medical Directorate and Transition Intermediate Management Organization, during an immersion tour inside the Keesler Medical Center at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, recently. The purpose of Place's two-day visit was to become more familiar with the medical center's mission capabilities and to receive the status of the 81st Medical Group's transition under DHA. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Every month Keesler Medical Center’s Labor and Delivery Clinic averages approximately 35 births

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Children's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

New equipment at Camp Lemonnier improves blood storage

Article
4/10/2019
Hospital Corpsmen 2nd Class Andrew Kays (right) and Christi Greenwood (left), deployed with the Expeditionary Medical Facility at Camp Lemonnier, receive training on the Automated Cell Processor 215 while Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Joshua Paddlety from Naval Hospital Sigonella, Italy, as part of implementation of the Frozen Blood Program here, March 13, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joe Rullo)

Frozen blood, which is stored at negative 70-degrees Celsius, can be used for up to 10 years

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Services Blood Program | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Elmo comes to Madigan

Article
4/3/2019
Sesame Street's Walkaround Elmo visited Madigan Army Medical Center families on April 1 to celebrate the seven-year anniversary of Military Kids Connect and the recent relaunch of its website. (U.S. Army photo by Ryan Graham)

Elmo began helping military kids and families with deployments and other military stressors in 2006

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Madigan Army Medical Center's emergency room helps shape MHS GENESIS

Article
4/1/2019
Krista Marcum, a staff nurse in Madigan Army Medical Center's emergency room, offers an MHS GENESIS demonstration to Defense Health Agency staff visiting Madigan. Marcum said these demonstrations often lead to MHS GENESIS-related brainstorming and problem solving. (U.S. Army photo by John Wayne Liston)

The ER encourages a culture of end user engagement; anyone can make a suggestion for an improvement to MHS GENESIS

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Electronic Health Record | MHS GENESIS | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Pediatric clinic works to keep children healthy

Article
3/22/2019
Air Force Senior Airman Shania Stanford, 366th Medical Support Squadron pediatric clinic aerospace medical technician, checks Jude's vitals during an appointment at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The pediatric clinic takes care of Airmen and their families by ensuring the overall health of their children. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew Kobialka)

The pediatric clinic’s objective is to care for children from birth to the age of 18

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Transformation, readiness topics of Navy surgeon general’s visit to Portsmouth

Article
3/13/2019
Navy Surgeon General, Vice Adm. Forrest Faison, visits Naval Medical Center Portsmouth's Branch Health Clinic Norfolk, Mar. 5, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Kris Lindstrom)

There is a great benefit when transformation is done right

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | MHS Transformation

Keesler Medical Center sees efficiencies, improved care under Defense Health Agency

Article
2/26/2019
Air Force Col. Michelle Aastrom, 81st Inpatient Operation Squadron commander, discusses the intensive care unit capabilities with Army Maj. Gen. Ronald Place, Defense Health Agency, director for the National Capital Region Medical Directorate and Transition Intermediate Management Organization, during an immersion tour inside the Keesler Medical Center at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 13, 2019. The purpose of Place's two-day visit was to become more familiar with the medical center's mission capabilities and to receive the status of the 81st Medical Group's transition under DHA. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Since transitioning in October 2018, Keesler Medical Center has seen benefits with the transition to DHA

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | MHS Transformation
<< < ... 11 12 13 14 > >> 
Showing results 151 - 165 Page 11 of 14

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.