Back to Top Skip to main content

Guard and Reserve crucial to CCATT expansion

Air Force Maj. Lori Wyatt, a Critical Care Air Transport Team nurse, assigned to the 167th Airlift Wing, Martinsburg, West Virginia, assembles a gurney during a casualty evacuation training at the Raleigh County Memorial Airport. The Air Force is increasing the number of CCATTs to support future readiness requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. De-Juan Haley) Air Force Maj. Lori Wyatt, a Critical Care Air Transport Team nurse, assigned to the 167th Airlift Wing, Martinsburg, West Virginia, assembles a gurney during a casualty evacuation training at the Raleigh County Memorial Airport. The Air Force is increasing the number of CCATTs to support future readiness requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. De-Juan Haley)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

FALLS CHURCH, Va. — The Air Force is increasing the number of Critical Care Air Transport Teams to support future readiness requirements.

CCATTs augment aeromedical evacuation crews that turn the back of an aircraft of opportunity into a flying intensive care unit. Made up of a three-person medical team, CCATTs provide advanced care, transporting severely injured or ill patients to higher levels of care.

"The National Defense Strategy directs the Department of Defense to realign planning efforts towards new national threats," said Air Force Brig. Gen. Robert Marks, Air Mobility Command Surgeon and chief of the Air Force Nurse Corps. "Air Force combatant commanders performed a requirements analysis and determined an increased need for critical care patient transport. As a result, the Air Force Medical Service is growing its CCATT capability."

CCATTs made up of Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve Command members constitute a significant piece of this expansion. The ANG plans on adding 34 teams and the AFRC plans on adding eight teams in 2020. Twenty-four new active duty teams are also planned for 2020.

"The Guard and Reserve support the bulk of aeromedical evacuation and CCATT capabilities," said Marks. "Any growth in the AFMS CCATT capacity always includes a sizeable Guard and Reserve footprint."

Guard and Reserve Airmen are a valuable addition to the Total Force, translating their civilian skills and experiences into their CCATT roles. Many work in civilian health facilities where the scope of practice exposes them to trauma and critical care on a daily basis.

"The civilian careers of many of our Reserve and Guard members provide opportunities to work at level 1 and 2 trauma centers," said Air Force Col. Robert Desko, Air National Guard Surgeon General. "This enables them to maintain the highest level of competencies in their field."

In addition to bringing their civilian capabilities to the Total Force CCATT capability, Guard and Reserve Airmen also solidify their skills through teaching.

"Many of our Guard and Reserve Airmen serving as CCATT physicians and nurses are board certified and experts in their field," said Air Force Col. Lisa Banyasz-de Silva, Reserve Division chief with the Air Force Reserve Command. "When they are not giving patient care, they are teaching and instructing in cutting-edge institutions. They bring their expert clinical skills to the battleground and give the best care possible to our warfighters."

This broad skillset is vital for CCATTs as they fill a critical role in augmenting aeromedical evacuation crews, safely and efficiently transporting the most critically ill or injured patients to higher echelons of care.

"CCATT capability lets our aeromedical evacuation system deliver advanced medical interventions to seamlessly transport patients from the point of injury to the rehabilitation medical facility," said Marks. "They are also able to provide this advanced care in the back of a military cargo aircraft and overcome the challenges that come with such an environment - low lighting, noise, high altitude, vibrations and a limited work space."

As the AFMS grows its CCATT capabilities, so will the vital role of the Guard and Reserve teams in meeting this crucial operational medicine requirement.

"CCATTs see a wide variety of patients with serious medical and surgical conditions," said Marks. "The broad clinical experience brought by our Total Force Airmen lets us field a stronger CCATT workforce."

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Air Force updates medical courses with COVID-19 content, procedures

Article
8/7/2020
Two lab technicians wearing full PPE handling vials for testing

COVID-19 has pushed instructors and trainers to be more innovative.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Health Readiness | Combat Support

Indiana National Guard continues to train in the COVID-19 environment

Article
8/5/2020
Soldiers in the field, wearing masks and testing equipment

Training in a time of COVID-19

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Health Readiness

Defending the Homeland: NMRTC Bremerton ensures Operational Readiness and a Medically Ready Force

Article
7/22/2020
Three healthcare workers wearing masks

Supporting mission readiness has long been a responsibility for the ready medical force of NMRTC Bremerton.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Health Readiness

Eighth Army Medics compete to see Who’s the Best

Article
7/21/2020
Soldiers on an obstacle course

The BMC is an annual competition that physically and intellectually challenges competitors.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

I am Navy Medicine: Lt. Daniel Murrish

Article
7/9/2020
Image of Lt. Daniel Murrish wearing a mask

Murrish was recently selected as NMRTCCP’s Officer of the Year for calendar year 2019.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Combat Support

Defending the Homeland: BACH Civilian earns RHC-A Civilian of the Year

Article
6/26/2020
Soldier and woman standing by two flags, crossed.

[Guidry] will advance to the U.S. Army’s Medical Command (MEDCOM) Civilian of the Year competition later this year.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Health Readiness | Combat Support

NMCSD Civilian Receives BUMED Civilian Biomedical Technician of the Year Award

Article
6/24/2020
Technician wearing mask, adjusting medical equipment

Navy identifies its top Civilian biomedical technician of the year!

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Navy Care virtual health app wins innovation award

Article
6/12/2020
Soldier in front of a computer monitor

Navy Care offers a live, virtual visit with a clinician — from the patient's smartphone, laptop, or computer.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Research and Innovation | Technology

Brooke AMC stands up new Strategic Trauma Readiness Center

Article
5/26/2020
Three surgeons discussing a patient on an operating table

What makes STaRC truly unique is its comprehensive assessment plan

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

FDA withdrawal of Zantac affects military health beneficiaries

Article
4/15/2020
Image of pharmacist counting out medication

Common heartburn drug pulled off shelves amid concerns

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Military medical training continues during COVID-19

Article
4/14/2020
Students and instructors in the METC Respiratory Therapist program practice safe distancing and wear face coverings while training with mechanical ventilators. (Photo by Oscar Lopez)

METC’s mission - to train the world's finest medics, corpsmen and technicians - is vital to force readiness and the nation.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Health Readiness

TCCC prepares Airmen for domestic response

Article
3/9/2020
PATRIOT South 2020 participants complete two-day Tactical Combat Casualty Care training course during PATRIOT South 20 at Gulfport Combat Readiness Training Center. PATRIOT South 20 is an annual, accredited Joint National Training Capability exercise that provides a simulated natural disaster environment for units to test their response and capabilities to conduct domestic operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Wendy Kuhn)

TCCC is not only applicable in combat casualty care, but also in mass casualty, disaster response or terrorist situations as well

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

METC combat medic training unveils new EMT sim labs

Article
3/3/2020
A team of combat medic trainees attend to a "patient" in the EMT warehouse lab.  Students engage in various scenarios in the newly designed EMT simulation labs that resemble real environments that expose students to lifelike patient encounters. (U.S. Army photo by Lisa Braun)

The sim labs have really come a long way

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Eyes on it: Optometry clinic ensures mission readiness

Article
2/4/2020
Dr. Courtney Humphrey, 633rd Aerospace Medicine Squadron optometrist, holds a lens used to look into a patient’s eye at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, Jan. 27, 2020. Humphrey is one of three doctors in the Langley AFB optometry clinic, treating active duty personnel from all branches. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sarah Dowe)

Eye exams are more than just reading a chart

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Sorry flu, not this year

Article
1/27/2020
U.S. Air Force Kathryn Klein, right, an aerospace medical service specialist with 182nd Medical Group, Illinois Air National Guard, administers an influenza vaccination during drill weekend at the 182nd Airlift Wing in Peoria, Ill., Dec. 8, 2019. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses, and the best prevention is getting a flu vaccine each year. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Paul R. Helmig II)

The Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support Medical supply chain teamed with Department of Defense partners to provide 3.4 million doses of the influenza vaccine to service members, dependents and retirees.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Health Readiness | Influenza Summary and Reports | Influenza, Northern Hemisphere | Seasonal Influenza Resource Center 2020-21
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 6

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.