Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Military medical heroes honored for service above and beyond

Image of Four military personnel shown during a Zoom call. Four of the awardees participated remotely during the Angels of the Battlefield Awards ceremony held virtually in Washington, D.C this October. (DoD Courtesy Photo.)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support

Some awards are meant to be put on a resume; the reasons for those given to real heroes should be seared into the collective memory.

As Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark. Milley recently noted, the service and sacrifice of heroes is “a core strength of our military's resolve and skill."

On October 27, medics, corpsmen, doctors, nurses and other medical personnel were were recognized for putting those fabled strengths into action at the Armed Services YMCA's 14th annual Angels of the Battlefield Awards ceremony in Washington, D.C.

The awards are given for selfless courage and unwavering sacrifice for actions from the past and present. Angels are nominated from each service for saving lives on the front lines overseas or during emergencies at home.

At age 100, the ‘Angel of Honor’ was bestowed on former Army 2nd Lt. Regina Benson, a member of the Army Nurse Corps during World War II, and the country’s oldest military nurse. From 1944 to 1946 she served in Army hospitals in the Pacific Theater, including during the Battle of Okinawa and the post-war occupation of Japan. “I made sure that my patients never died alone,” she remembered, “I was always there with them.”

Air Force Staff Sergeant Nicholas Brunetto, served as a medic with the Army Green Berets team when they were ambushed at close range in February 2020 in Afghanistan. Brunetto not only managed the evacuation of nearly a dozen patients while under attack, but also perform a blood transfusion while under enemy gunfire to save a soldier’s life. Brunetto later said he had not expect being awarded for his service: “A lot of it was just being there and doing a job I had volunteered for.”

Navy Hospital Corpsman First Class William McGrath, was attached to a Fleet Marine Forces team in January 2020 in East Africa, where he served as both as a shooter and as a medic in the face of an enemy attack on an American command center and airfield. McGrath not only saved the life of a wounded team member, but treated multiple injured firefighters and security forces.  “You’re a medic first and a shooter always,” McGrath recalled, “Your jobs really go hand in hand once there is a casualty.”

Coast Guard Aviation Survival Technician Second Class James Chandler saved a woman’s life during Tropical Storm Imelda in 2019 by performing CPR on her for over 30 minutes. An immigrant from England, he came to the U.S. to play pro football, but gained hero status upon becoming a citizen and rescue swimmer in uniform. “Looking back … two things come to mind: Very fortunate that I was able to fly on that case with such a great crew and also just very humbled in regard to how precious life is. … There’s no doubt in my mind that I have the best job in the world.”

Army Sergeant First Class Kyle Wagner, a combat medic on a mission in Afghanistan in June 2013, was just one week into his deployment, when an IED exploded10 feet from him. Injured and unable to hear, he organized the medical evacuation while searching for casualties, pulled other soldiers to safety and started triage. “We will do whatever it takes to save our guys … because we care; that’s what we’re here for.”

The identity of a Navy Seal based in California remains confidential, due to the sensitive nature of his current deployment. He was recognized for tending to more than 200 patients during an overseas mission from 2019 to 2020. “I wish I could share how appreciative I am in person,” he wrote to those attending the ceremony, “However, I am currently deployed.”

You also may be interested in...

Bulgarian Armed Forces Demonstrate Combat Medical Advancements

Article
8/22/2022
Two medics tend to a dummy in a simulated emergency.

Bulgarian Armed Forces showed off their combat lifesaving training to a U.S. delegation Aug. 10.

Recommended Content:

Education & Training | Health Readiness & Combat Support | Global Health Engagement

DHA Program Supports Training Education of Future Medical Providers

Article
7/20/2022
Military personnel looking at display

The Clinical Investigations Program combines research and training to teach and develop the future clinicians of the Military Health System.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Education & Training | Health Care Technology | Health Readiness & Combat Support

The Need for Speed Requires Intense Training

Article
7/18/2022
 Military personnel conducts routine ops in US 3rd Fleet

Tom Cruise has nothing on real military pilots and their training.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Education & Training | Physical Fitness

Army Experts: Rabies Risk is Not Worth It

Article
7/5/2022
Army Experts: Rabies Risk is Not Worth It

Almost 60,000 people around the world die from rabies each year. Despite the common belief that rabid animals are easily identified by foaming at the mouth and aggressive behavior, infected animals may not look sick or act strangely.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Public Health | Rabies

Final Days in Afghanistan: Lab Techs Stepped Up to Support Withdrawal

Article
6/30/2022
Final Days in Afghanistan Lab Techs Stepped Up to Support Withdrawal

“Prior to the attack, teams were preparing to leave the area. Suddenly, everything changed, and our main goal shifted from COVID-19 support to blood supply and triage.”

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support

How Drones Will Transform Battlefield Medicine – and Save Lives

Article
6/23/2022
Drones carrying fresh blood products to wounded troops on the front lines may be critical for military medicine in a conflict against a "near-peer" adversary.

Emerging technology may use drones to deliver blood products for wounded troops on the front lines of combat. That capability may be critical in a "near-peer" conflict.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support

How MHS GENESIS will become essential to patients' health journey

Article
6/21/2022
Dr. Robert Marshall, program director of the Department of Defense Clinical Informatics Fellowship at Madigan Army Medical Center.

Ensuring proper training of both providers and patients is essential for the successful integration and sustainment of MHS GENESIS into MHS care.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Health Care Technology | MHS GENESIS Toolkit | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | MHS GENESIS

How Military Medicine Is Preparing for the Next Conflict

Article
6/8/2022
As the Pentagon prepares today’s force for a “near-peer” fight against a large military adversary, the Military Health System is challenged to provide life-saving support for large-scale and dispersed operations.

As the Pentagon prepares today’s force for a “near-peer” fight against a large military adversary, the Military Health System is challenged to provide life-saving support for large-scale and dispersed operations. That’s especially true for the medics supporting troops on the front lines.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Health Care Technology | Education & Training | Medical Education and Training Campus

Army Doctor Earns Top Honors at Air Assault School at Fort Campbell

Article
6/3/2022
Army Doctor Earns Top Honors at Air Assault School at Fort Campbell

This Army doctor finished at the top of his class at the Air Assault School at Fort Campbell. It's a 10-day course that is both physically and academically challenging, teaching soldiers the foundations of heliborne operations to include troop transportation, sling loaded cargo and equipment transportation, medical and casualty evacuation operations, and air assault operations.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support

Could a Therapy Dog Help with Your Dental Anxiety?

Article
6/2/2022
Air Force Brig. Gen. Goldie, a facility therapy dog at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, helps reduce anxiety in a patient with complex dental conditions that require multiple appointments. The use of therapy dogs is part of an ongoing study with these patients.

A first-of-its-kind study at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center is researching whether using facility therapy dogs in dentists’ offices could reduce patient anxiety and improve outcomes for military dental treatment programs.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Total Force Fitness

Tips for Military Parents Planning PCS Moves with Children

Article
6/2/2022
Moving can be hard on military families, especially on children. Moving to a new home, going to a new school, finding new friends – it can be unsettling for kids of any age. Yet there are things that service members can do to prepare for a permanent change of station move that can make for a smoother transition for the children.

Moving can be hard on military families, especially on children. Moving to a new home, going to a new school, finding new friends – it can be unsettling for kids of any age. Yet, there are things that service members can do to prepare for a permanent change of station move that can make for a smoother transition for the children.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Total Force Fitness

Corneal Collagen Cross Linking in the Military a Game Changer

Article
5/27/2022
Corneal collagen cross-linking, known as CXL, the first and only treatment to date that is proven to stop Keratoconus, KCN, progression.

Corneal collagen cross-linking, known as CXL, the first and only treatment to date that is proven to stop Keratoconus, KCN, progression.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support

Facility Dogs Play a Vital Role in Recovery for Patients Across the MHS

Article
5/27/2022
Luke is a German Shephard facility dog.

Each dog has his or her own rank, service, and uniform and is inducted in an enlistment or commissioning ceremony. Today, the Facility Dog Program at WRNMMC includes Sully, a yellow Lab who was former President George H.W. Bush’s service dog.

Recommended Content:

Our History | Health Readiness & Combat Support

After Leading Through the Pandemic, TRICARE Pharmacy Chief Retires

Article
5/27/2022
Pharmacy Services

How COVID-driven changes are improving the TRICARE Pharmacy System.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Health Care Technology

How Health Care Providers Can Mitigate Burnout

Article
5/25/2022
U.S. Army Soldiers load a simulated patient on to a New Jersey National Guard UH-60L Black Hawk helicopter during a combat lifesaver course run by the Medical Simulation Training Center on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey, April 14, 2022.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Matt Hecht)

“No one is immune to burnout. Healthcare providers are very good at rescuing others. We train for it and practice it daily. Unfortunately, we often do so at the expense of our own health and wellness.”

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Health Readiness & Combat Support
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 7
Refine your search
Last Updated: July 20, 2022

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.