Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Don’t Underestimate Mother Nature: Winter Safety Tips for Cold Weather

Image of Military Personnel training. Soldiers from Charlie Company, 2-116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team, Idaho Army National Guard, practice combined arms battalion, squad-level infantry movements on the Orchard Combat Training Center, Jan. 20, 2019. The training combined dry-fire rehearsal culminating in a live-fire exercise (Photo by: Thomas Alvarez, Idaho Army National Guard).

Recommended Content:

Environmental Fitness | Winter Safety | Total Force Fitness

Never forget the power of nature and its effects, especially if exploring outdoors during the coldest months of the year.

In wintertime, "hands down, the worst mistake you can make is to underestimate what challenges nature is capable of and overestimate your own abilities," said Army Master Sgt. Daniel Fields.

"These are the root causes of the majority of the troubles that I have seen."

Two crucial aspects of retaining readiness in winter climates are nutrition and liquids uptake, he said. The same safety tips apply to hikers, skiers and campers.

The field packs that infantry troops carry contain more nutrient-dense foods and snacks, for example.

Despite the added nutrients, "soldiers can spiral pretty quickly into hypothermia from the 'shell-core effect,'" Fields said. The shell core effect takes over when soldiers are on the move in the winter. They use up more energy. They sweat in their winter uniforms. If they don't eat or drink, they can become dehydrated, cold and fatigued.

"There is decreased blood flow to the extremities," he explained. "A consequence is cold diuresis, where they urinate more and more frequently," thus becoming more and more dehydrated. Diuresis occurs because the body has to filter more blood through the core to keep warm, thus engaging the kidneys in more urine production as they eliminate toxins.

A slew of other issues can also happen, such as chilblains and frostbite, even when soldiers have been educated about the effects of the cold, Fields noted. That's what training is for: "Sometimes it takes a little while to get them to understand until they're experienced and comfortable working in the cold."

For those dealing with winter's cold temperatures and possibly snow, sleet, or frozen rain, here is Fields' top advice:

  1. Embrace the extremes of the environment. Don't hide from it.
  2. Seek every available opportunity to acclimate and train in the cold. This only builds confidence and proficiency.
  3. Prior to conducting an outdoor winter activity, seek ways to educate yourself about the specific activity.
  4. Invest in quality outdoor clothing and equipment. The dividends will be priceless.
  5. Understand the effects of the cold (or altitude) on the body.

Picture of winter training gear
Soldiers from the 10th Mountain Division train on cold weather tactics with subject matter experts from the 86th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Mountain) as part of the annual Mountain Legacy event, Camp Ethan Allen Training Site, Jericho, Vermont, in February 2021 ( Photo by: Army Maj. J. Scott Detweiler, Joint Force Headquarters, Vermont National Guard).

"If soldiers are prepared, mentally and physically, with the proper training and equipment, those units will be extremely effective, year round and in any climate. A soldier well trained and experienced in the cold will also perform at a high level in more hospitable weather," he said.

A soldier trained only in summertime or under ideal conditions will have great difficulty when operating in cold weather, he warned. "In many cases, soldiers and units have an absolute inability to perform effectively in extreme cold."

"When the mercury drops and the snow falls, avoid (when prudent) conducting indoor physical training. Snowshoeing for example, is an excellent opportunity to allow soldiers to become familiar and comfortable with their cold weather uniform and equipment while at the same time conducting physical training," Fields said.

Educational opportunities for wintertime activities exist at many colleges and outdoor recreation groups or co-ops, Fields said. "If you'd like to go backcountry skiing, snowshoeing or camping, for example, take an avalanche awareness course, a wilderness first aid course or even a backcountry camping course.

Avoid tight fitting, restrictive clothing, especially garments made with cotton. "Wear clothing loose and in layers to maximize the benefits of the insulating properties of the clothing."

"Many live by the mantra: 'There is no bad weather, only bad equipment (clothing).'"

Finally, Fields said: "Continually study and learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of cold weather injuries. Most importantly, know how to prevent and treat dehydration, hypothermia, chilblains and frost bite."

Here are some other top tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for staying safe:

  • Bring extra water with you and plan to drink more water when exerting yourself outdoors in the cold.
  • Carry a rucksack or backpack filled with nutrient-dense foods, an aluminum blanket, a compass, back-up battery for your cell phone, mirror, rope, utility knife, and first aid kit.
  • Carry extra gloves or mittens in case yours get wet.
  • Stay on the trails. Off trail, you might not be able to see trunk holes, rocks and other potential hazards.
  • Tell someone where you're going, with whom, and when you plan to be back. Create a time when they should alert authorities that you may be lost or injured.
  • Be aware of frostbite, which can show up sooner than you think. Never immerse a frostbitten extremity in hot water. Instead, you should gradually warm up the extremity over time to avoid damage to blood vessels and tissues.
  • If a heavy snowstorm starts, stay where you are and build a lean-to if you can. Don't wander off, so that rescuers can more easily find you if needed.
  • Have a safety kit ready in your car's trunk that includes blankets, protein bars, water, first aid kit, and an auto safety kit that includes flares.
  • A colorful rag may be useful to hang out your window so snow plows can see you.
  • In an emergency, stay put until help comes if at all possible.

You also may be interested in...

Air Quality Awareness in a Haze

Article Around MHS
9/15/2022
Hazy sunset view at Puget Sound

Due to raging wildfires scorching thousands of acres from British Columbia to northern California, there’s been a murky layer which has settled over the entire area, which has even closed highways and mountain passes in Washington State.

Recommended Content:

Environmental Exposures | Wildfires | Environmental Fitness | Summer Safety

Battalion Hosts Critical Medical Training

Article Around MHS
8/24/2022
Military personnel in combat training exercise

Allied Forces North Battalion conducted a week-long Combat Lifesaver Course July 25-29.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Education & Training | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability | Global Health Security Agenda

How Performance Nutrition Can Help You Maintain Readiness

Article
7/29/2022
A person serving himself a salad

Performance nutrition is a major key to force readiness.

Recommended Content:

Performance Nutrition: Fuel Your Body and Mind | Total Force Fitness | Nutritional Fitness

August Performance Triad Month

Article Around MHS
7/21/2022
Color graphic depicting aspects of wellness.

As part of its August “P3 for All” campaign, the U.S. Army Public Health Center is encouraging all Army leaders, soldiers, family members and soldiers for life to embrace the synergy of sleep, activity and nutrition, the core components of the Performance Triad, along with the important elements of mental readiness and spiritual readiness.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Physical Fitness | Nutritional Fitness | Sleep

Are You Prepared for a Disaster?

Article
7/7/2022
Start by creating a basic disaster emergency kit and create a plan to get back together as a family in the event of a disaster.

How to prepare for an evacuation affecting your family? Or even losing your home? Start by creating a basic disaster emergency kit and create a plan to get back together as a family in the event of a disaster.

Recommended Content:

Emergency Preparedness and Response | Disaster Prep Toolkit | Environmental Fitness | Summer Safety

Tactical Diaper Bags and Other Fathers' Day Tips from a Marine Officer

Article
6/16/2022
Tactical Diaper Bags and Other Fathers' Day Tips from a Marine Officer

“When we deploy, our lives become simpler, while theirs become more complex: In addition to missing their husband and father, they are missing someone who should be helping to shoulder the burden that military life places on kids.”

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness

Tactical Diaper Bags and Other Fathers' Day Tips from a Marine Officer

Photo
6/16/2022
Tactical Diaper Bags and Other Fathers' Day Tips from a Marine Officer

An experienced military dad offers advice to new service members beginning their parenting journey.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness

Could a Therapy Dog Help with Your Dental Anxiety?

Article
6/2/2022
Air Force Brig. Gen. Goldie, a facility therapy dog at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, helps reduce anxiety in a patient with complex dental conditions that require multiple appointments. The use of therapy dogs is part of an ongoing study with these patients.

A first-of-its-kind study at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center is researching whether using facility therapy dogs in dentists’ offices could reduce patient anxiety and improve outcomes for military dental treatment programs.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Total Force Fitness

Tips for Military Parents Planning PCS Moves with Children

Article
6/2/2022
Moving can be hard on military families, especially on children. Moving to a new home, going to a new school, finding new friends – it can be unsettling for kids of any age. Yet there are things that service members can do to prepare for a permanent change of station move that can make for a smoother transition for the children.

Moving can be hard on military families, especially on children. Moving to a new home, going to a new school, finding new friends – it can be unsettling for kids of any age. Yet, there are things that service members can do to prepare for a permanent change of station move that can make for a smoother transition for the children.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness & Combat Support | Total Force Fitness

PTSD Awareness Month - PTSD Awareness

Infographic
6/1/2022
PTSD Awareness Month - PTSD Awareness

Unfortunately, experiencing trauma is not uncommon. If you’ve experienced trauma and notice symptoms of #PTSD, don’t hesitate to ask your primary care provider about possible treatment. #TreatmentWorks #PTSDAwarenessMonth www.health.mil/ptsd

Recommended Content:

June | Total Force Fitness | Psychological Fitness | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

PTSD Awareness Month - Treatment Works

Infographic
6/1/2022
PTSD Awareness Month - Treatment Works

Experiencing #PTSD can make one feel hopeless. Fortunately, there are strategies and treatments that WORK to relieve PTSD symptoms. Don’t wait, seek help today. #PTSDAwarenessMonth www.health.mil/ptsd

Recommended Content:

June | Total Force Fitness | Psychological Fitness | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Air Force Surgeon General eyes modernizing capabilities for joint commanders (Part 2)

Article Around MHS
5/27/2022
Military medical personnel at Patrick AFB

Since assuming his role of Air Force Surgeon General, Lt. Gen. Robert Miller has worked to advance the Air Force Medical Service’s capabilities, ensuring it is ready for an evolving joint fight.

Recommended Content:

Medical Logistics | Defense Medical Readiness Training Institute | Health Readiness & Combat Support | Total Force Fitness

Walter Reed Service Dogs

Photo
5/27/2022
Walter Reed Service Dogs

Luke, a German Shepherd facility dog at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, stays with wounded warrior Heath Calhoun at the Military Advanced Treatment Center facility while Calhoun undergoes rehab therapy. Luke is officially a Navy Hospital Corpsman Third Class.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness

Holiday Food Safety Tip: Cook Food Thoroughly

Infographic
5/25/2022
Holiday Food Safety Tip: Cook Food Thoroughly

Use a thermometer to ensure your food is cooked to the right minimum internal temperature.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Nutritional Fitness

Holiday Food Safety Tip: Keep Cold Food Cold

Infographic
5/25/2022
Holiday Food Safety Tip: Keep Cold Food Cold

Don't let your cold dishes sit out on a counter for more than 2 hours. Keep it chilled at 40 degrees or less.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Nutritional Fitness
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 8
Refine your search
Last Updated: December 23, 2021

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.