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Studies

On this page you can find various studies developed by Military Health System. Please scroll down or use the search box to find specific studies.

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Health-related quality of life within the first 5 years following military-related concurrent mild traumatic brain injury and polytrauma.

Study

Abstract

This study examined health-related quality of life within the first 5 years following concurrent mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and polytrauma. Participants were 167 U.S. service members who had sustained a MTBI who had completed a brief neurobehavioral evaluation within 3 months postinjury and at least one telephone follow-up interview at 6 (n = 46), 12 (n = 89), 24 (n = 54), 36 (n = 42), 48 (n = 30) or 60 months (n = 25) postinjury. Within the first 5 years postinjury, service members reported ongoing headaches (67.4% to 92.0%), bodily pain (66.7% to 88.9%), medication use (71.7% to 92.0%), mental health treatment (28.3% to 60.0%), and the need for help with daily activities (18.5% to 40.0%). Problematic alcohol consumption was common within the first 24 months postinjury (23.9% to 29.2%). Many service members were working for pay (36.0% to 70.8%) though many reported a decline in work quality (16.0% to 30.4%). Despite ongoing symptom reporting, many service members reported that their medications were effective (43.3% to 80.0%), good/excellent health status (68.0% to 80.0%), and life satisfaction (79.6% to 90.5%). A minority reported suicidal or homicidal ideation (5.6% to 14.8%). Recovery from MTBI in a military setting is complex and multifaceted. Continued support and care for all service members who sustain a combat-related MTBI with polytrauma is recommended, regardless of the presence or absence of symptom reporting within the first few months postinjury.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: August 01, 2014
  • Citation: Brickell TA, Lange RT, French LM. Health-related quality of life within the first 5 years following military-related concurrent mild traumatic brain injury and polytrauma. Mil Med. 2014 Aug;179(8):827-38.

Assessing functional impairment in a working military population: the Walter Reed functional impairment scale.

Study

Abstract

Measurement of functional impairment is a priority for the military and other professional work groups routinely exposed to stressful traumatic events as part of their occupation. Standard measures of impairment used in general or chronically ill populations contain many items not suitable for these populations, and include mental health symptoms items that are not true measures of functioning. We created a new, 14-item scale-the Walter Reed Functional Impairment Scale-to assess functioning in 4 domains (physical, occupational, social, and personal). We asked 3,380 soldiers how much difficulty they currently have in each of the 4 domains on a 5-point scale. Behaviorally based psychosocial and occupational performance measures and general health questions were used to validate the scale. The utility of the scale was assessed against clinical measures of psychopathology and physical health (depression, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], general health, generalized physical symptoms). We utilized Cronbach's alpha, item response theory, and the score test for trend to establish consistency of items and the validity of the scale. The scale exhibited excellent reliability (Cronbach's α= 0.92) and validity. The individual items and quartiles of sum scores were strongly correlated with negative occupational and social performance, and the utility of the scale was demonstrated by strong correlations with depression, PTSD, and high levels of generalized physical symptoms. This scale exhibits excellent psychometric properties in this sample of U.S. soldiers and, pending future research, is likely to have utility for other healthy occupational groups.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: August 01, 2014
  • Citation: Herrell RK, Edens EN, Riviere LA, Thomas JL, Bliese PD, Hoge CW. Assessing functional impairment in a working military population: the Walter Reed functional impairment scale. Psychol Serv. 2014 Aug;11(3):254-64.

Update: Routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2009-June 2014.

Study

Abstract

This report contains an update through June 2014 of the results of routine screening for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among civilian applicants for military service and among members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces. Seroprevalences among civilian applicants in 2013 and the first half of 2014 (0.19 and 0.15 per 1,000 tested, respectively) were markedly lower than in 2012 (0.27 per 1,000 tested). In nearly every component of every service, seroprevalences in 2013 and 2014 were either similar or lower than in prior years; however, in the Army National Guard, seroprevalences increased each year and approximately doubled from 2010 (0.18 per 1,000 tested) to 2013-2014 (0.35-0.41 per 1,000 tested). Among active and reserve component service members, seroprevalences continue to be higher among Army and Navy members and males than their respective counterparts.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: August 01, 2014
  • Citation: AFHSC. Update: Routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2009-June 2014. MSMR. 2014 Aug;21(8):16-22.
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